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View Full Version : Question on Yugo M-76 and FPK Sniper versions


jonnybigguns
June 26, 2007, 21:43
Anyone have one? These 2 rifles have interested me for some time. I'm wondering about accuracy and fit and finish. I'm looking at one that was built by Century. Very pricey, wondering if it's worth investing in. Before you ask, I already have three Fals. Thank's The FPK is in 762x54 and the Yugo is 8mm. The RPK is Romanian and I've heard that the finish isn't very good, they run about 800.00. The Yugo is about 2000.00 with scope and 2 mags.

hockeysew
June 26, 2007, 22:39
I just went through similar Johnny-
In doing a bit of research and from gunshow prices, Yugos can be a crapshoot.
Sometimes the quality isnt very good and unless it is unissued, the barrel may be a sewer.
I ended up with a very nice Romainian underfolder WASR for $400.00
Matching #'s and unissued. So what if it was a convert from a single stack?
Shoots very smooth and saving about $150 to $200 over a comparable Yugo, why not?
Check that the sights and gasblock align well and that the mags arent too loose.

Kyrottimus
June 27, 2007, 09:52
Personally I don't like anything from Yugoslavia because in my eyes, any country that's too cheap to chrome a bore/chamber (both at the same time) or even finish their Bolt/Bolt-Carrier (Yes, those are in the white) of their MILITARY rifles, isn't a country where I'll be buying arms from.

FWIW; IMHO...

wolfsburgbob
June 28, 2007, 12:13
"Money" was not the issue with the chrome. Politics was. The Soviets would not give them any chrome, and neither would we.

All of the Yugo stuff was built to look like "tanks" (thick),..because all they have to make guns from is,... "butter ass" soft steel.

No chrome,..no good,... nowhere.

mj2evans
July 05, 2007, 14:38
Yugos don't have access to chromium deposits in their country (as previously stated). Its not a cheap resource. While I like a chrome bore on a military gun its not essential *IF* you clean properly. Look at all the K98, SMLE, M1s, etc that are still around in good shape. I really like my Yugo underfold (for a $150 parts kit dark bore) - its a fun bullet hose and has built in history factor.

Kyrottimus
July 05, 2007, 15:24
Originally posted by mj2evans
Yugos don't have access to chromium deposits in their country (as previously stated). Its not a cheap resource. While I like a chrome bore on a military gun its not essential *IF* you clean properly. Look at all the K98, SMLE, M1s, etc that are still around in good shape. I really like my Yugo underfold (for a $150 parts kit dark bore) - its a fun bullet hose and has built in history factor.

Cleaning is not the issue from a military standpoint when it comes to the reason of chrome lining (well not the main issue anyways); bore erosion is. You put 1,000 rounds, hot, through a barrel every week or so and good luck seeing the difference between the lands and grooves. The barrel would be shot out so fast (ask any Yugo AK owner who bulit one off of a Yugo Parts kit; most barrels were shot out before they even made it into Country).

In a firefight using modern tactics and weapons, you want a bore that'll last more than a few months of heavy fighting before it turns into a smooth-bore bullet-hose.

The K98, SMLE and M1 barrels are still mostly decent, and don't need chrome-lining, because the rate of fire that is usually used through them is USUALLY not rapid enough to warrant the need of chrome-lining. In rifles like that overall accuracy is more important than rate of fire.

While this is a yugo-sniper weapon we're talking about, and it doesn't really need a chrome-bore.. the BC and Bolt are both still in the white. No go if you ask me. Any standard AK (or any military battle rifle for that matter) that doesn't have a chrome-lined bore is not one I'd ever consider buying/using.

308@noon
August 10, 2007, 08:33
Zastava did not chrome line their rifles as they felt its not necessary due to the RC of their barrels and proper maintence. The Serbs are required to keep their rifle clean and they do. The imported sets that came here are not from Serbia and that is why many were junk as they sat in piles in the open wet warehouses.

The simple fact that chrome lining is not really a big deal and does affect accuracy as they are aware.

The M76 really has to rely on good 8mm ammunition. They stopped production on these rifles many years ago. They will make them again for a large order but there are other problems with regard to production and lost CNC data during the war. On the open market there is not any military demand.

The new receiver that is being made is adequate and there may be some very minor tweaking if needed and that this about it for the Century units. The recoil is almost nil, and they are historical. Some think they are pricey right now by a few hundred dollars.....but with inflation since 1990 then they are probabaly priced right.....The original Mitchell Imports, though few were imported, sold for $1,500 rifle alone, the scope and mount were $550 so you do the math.

It's the old story of man I should have bought that when they were XXX back in 2007......there only going to appreciate. Don't worry about the Century part just buy it and if it needs any tweaking then no big deal. These are not like the M70's they built, its much harder to screw up the M76.

ROMAK IV
August 18, 2007, 22:03
I was considering an M-76, it's been rebuilt by Rapidfire, is 8mm and has a milled receiver. From a collectable standpoint, it is quite unique, but I wanted something fuctional as well, and once the supply of surplus 8mm dried up, there wasn't a reason to. So if you want one and can afford it, it's a good collectable. An FPK, PSL, or ROMAK III, whatever you call it, is quite a bargain. For the price of the M-76, you can have a ROMAK III and 5-6000 rounds of ammunition. The government HAS been trying to keep them out of the country, but God bless the Romanians, they keep finding a way to get them in, but supply is spotty. Mine was assembled by Tennesee Guns and had a couple of "issues"; a hammer too high and binded up the bolt carrier, and no BHO device. Both items were taken care of by me at no cost, so I now have a reliable rifle in 7.62 x 54R. The ROMAK III is a military rifle of a sort, and it's quite inexpensive to shoot. It's also as easy to clean as any other AK based rifle, so corrosive ammuntion really isn't an issue. The barrel is forged and rifled like any good barrel, but since it is rather thin I would expect some stringing as it heats up. It's an accurate rifle, but not a really accurate rifle, and wasn't ever intended to be. With ammunition that still costs what 7.62 x 39 USED to cost, it is a bargain. I'm thinking of getting two!