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View Full Version : Found a different looking L1A1 sight, What is it?


Texxut
June 09, 2007, 00:38
I picked up this rear sight and it fit on my L1A1, but, it's much lower than the stock rear sight. I like the ears on it and the flip 150 and 250 peeps, so if it can be used on this rifle, I'd like to use it. Will the front sight post depress enough to work? Will I need to replace the front sight? Is this going to work at all or am I beating a dead horse?
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v30/Texxut/L1A1Mysterysight.jpg

Question #2: Where can I buy a front sight post? The one I have now is bent sightly to one side and if I break it trying to bend it back, I'd like to have a replacement ready to go.

Question #3: Here is a picture of the piston from my L1 and my brother's L1, does anyone know where they were made? My L1 is all inch, my brother's is metric upper / Inch lower.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v30/Texxut/Pistons.jpg

And I quess while I'm at it, Here is a picture of my L1A1:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v30/Texxut/L1A1web.jpg

Mosin Guy
June 09, 2007, 00:52
the sight you have is a Metric Para flip sight and will more than likely be to short to work with your front sight post,the L1A1 uses a tall rear sight.....

W.E.G.
June 09, 2007, 01:01
Nice looking rifle.

You won't be able to get the sights regulated with that para rear sight installed.

The gas piston with the thicker girdle looks like it could be one of the Century two-piece abominations. If it is, you should throw it away and get a piston that won't bend.

I forget who posted this pic. But, I think the idea was OEM pistons on the left, US on the right.

Texxut
June 09, 2007, 01:18
Thanks for the information fellows, Too bad about not getting to use that rear sight, I really like it. Hummmmm, may be an excuse for another rifle.:D
I have bought rifles because I had a bayonet to fit it. I may have to find a rifle to go under this sight.
PS: I'll check that piston to see if it is the two piece. Thanks for the heads up.

Radio
June 09, 2007, 02:03
Well, just to be technical, you COULD pound off your Inch gas block and install a Metric block in its place, then change much of your gas system over to the Metric configuration. Change would need to be the gas plug, adjustment ring, ring "spring", front sight, front sight spring. With your Para rear sight, this would give you a compatible front/rear sight picture.

On the other hand, get rid of the Para sight and use the standard, handy-dandy Inch flip rear sight. Really nice when using a SUIT or QD scope.

--Radio

NHBandit
June 09, 2007, 05:24
Looks like an excuse to build a para to me.... :biggrin:

bykerhd
June 09, 2007, 07:44
Time to build another rifle.
Shame to let that nice sight sit around unused.

That was an old pic of mine of the gas pistons. The one on the right is indeed one of the legendary two-piece Century "El Crapola" gas pistons. I could probably be persuaded to part with such a fine "collector" item.
For the right price.:D

Texxut
June 09, 2007, 07:47
Thanks for the picture. Are those OEM pistons on the left, US on the right?

bykerhd
June 09, 2007, 08:42
The three on the left are OEM as I recall.
Century on the far right. The black one is DSA. There is a TAPCO stainless with the kind of rounded look and I think the other was an earlier generation DSA.
Could be a bit off. That picture was a while back.

J. Armstrong
June 09, 2007, 08:51
The current Tapcos are well marked with "Tapco" on them ( what else :) ).
DO NOT use that Century two piece!!!! Bending is bad enough bujt if you don't catch it right away, it can be a b**** to get out !

Bwana John
June 09, 2007, 08:56
Hey Texxut,
While the OEM metric Para sight will not work on an inch rifle because of the tall sight height, a member here (mtlmkr7.62) machined custom Para sight bases of inch height.

His sight bases are windage adjustable and use a 2 position flip aperture M-16A2 rear sight and M16-A2 other parts. You can get all the M-16A2 parts for ~$25.

I have one of mtlmkr7.62's inch height Para style sight bases(stripped) that I would be willing to trade for your metric Para rear sight(complete). I could throw in a M-16A2 aperture with T3 (tritium) inserts or a little cash, you would still need to purchase the rest of the sight parts

Here is a link to DSA that shows what the windage adjustable Para rear sight looks like.http://www.dsarms.com/prodinfo.asp?number=DSA110

Please Pm me if you are intrested, the inch Para sight is well made, fit and finish are really nice

Texxut
June 09, 2007, 13:34
J. Armstrong and Bwana John,
I have PM'ed you both. Thanks guys !

bykerhd,
does the piston (next to the two piece) in my picture, look to be OEM or could it be US? According to Century, my rifle had US parts- Buttstock/PG/HG/HTS & Piston, but the trigger and piston are not marked.
The Century marked reciever has a NC0003xx S/N, if that helps.

Radio
June 09, 2007, 14:29
So somebody explain which piston is cast, which piston is forged, and which piston is hypereutectic.

Domed or dish. And show one with a Dykes ring.

Eh?
--Radio

bykerhd
June 09, 2007, 14:29
I'm not an expert on gas pistons. I just seem to have acquired quite a few somehow ? To me that piston looks like an OEM. Is the tapered tail end threaded ? or drilled ? or solid ? The earlier U.S. gas pistons weren't usually marked. I think the current ones all are.
If your receiver is marked as U.S. made, it is part of your parts count. As far as I know Century never made any triggers for Inch guns.
Imbel receivered guns had Century's H/S, buttstock, pistolgrip, forend, gas piston and muzzle brake.
Some of the last guns they put out had U.S. receivers AND barrels. Not sure what foreign parts then were used as Century would not supply more U.S. parts than they had to.

J. Armstrong
June 09, 2007, 15:27
Originally posted by Radio
And show one with a Dykes ring.

Eh?
--Radio

Careful here - youi'll get us sent to DB- some states don't allow that kinda marriage, doncha know ;) :biggrin:

Texxut
June 09, 2007, 16:36
Originally posted by bykerhd
I'm not an expert on gas pistons. I just seem to have acquired quite a few somehow ? To me that piston looks like an OEM. Is the tapered tail end threaded ? or drilled ? or solid ? The earlier U.S. gas pistons weren't usually marked. I think the current ones all are.
---------------------------
The piston is solid at the tapered end. That also leads me to another question I had. The the end that smacks the carrier sticks out of the hole .027 " at rest. Should this be flush with the hole it comes out of? I can shorten the tail on this piston if it's needed.


________________________________________________
If your receiver is marked as U.S. made, it is part of your parts count. As far as I know Century never made any triggers for Inch guns.
Imbel receivered guns had Century's H/S, buttstock, pistolgrip, forend, gas piston and muzzle brake.
-----------------------------
This rifle had the century MB at one time. It came to me with the FH you see in my picture.

__________________________________________________

Some of the last guns they put out had U.S. receivers AND barrels. Not sure what foreign parts then were used as Century would not supply more U.S. parts than they had to.
-----------------------------
It's my understanding, this is one of Centurys early rifles. It's built on an Australian rifle. Completely inch pattern.

bykerhd
June 09, 2007, 21:21
Some of the parts Century used might have come from an Australian rifle.
But not the U.S. parts and the upper receiver.
The lower receiver will have a serial number with AD as a prefix if it is Australian. UB or UE will be British.
What markings are on the upper receiver ?
Century used several over the years. The last two were made in the U.S. They also used Imbels made in Brazil with different markings and features as well as U.S. made Hesse and some almost unmarked receivers, from Argentina ?, I think.

Texxut
June 09, 2007, 22:08
Yes, it has a number preceded by AD on the right side lower.
The Upper is marked:
Century Arms Inc
St Albons VT
R1A1 soprter 308 cal
Made in USA

I have another question?
The the end that smacks the carrier sticks out of the hole .027 " at rest. Should this be flush with the hole it comes out of? I can shorten the tail on this piston if it's needed.

owlcreekok
June 09, 2007, 22:44
I just shortened the pistons for the same reason. One inch , one metric.

Hell, I didn't even ask ce's permission.

:shades:

bykerhd
June 09, 2007, 23:29
Actually the tail of the gas piston should be recessed slightly in to the receiver.
About a 1/16" I believe. Definitely should not be sticking out in to the receiver.

There are threads that will have pictures of Century's U.S. receiver's feed ramps. The first version is nicknamed the "Unibrow" due to it's single feed ramp. The later version has two. The later versions have usually had fewer functioning issues reported. Try a search on Unibrow and see if it looks like yours. Yours was made in the last few years and is a made in U.S. piece.

Get a decent U.S. made one-piece gas piston to replace that crappy two piece Century version, adjust to length if necessary, and you should be good to go.

It would appear your compliance parts would be upper receiver, hammer, sear, buttstock, pistol grip, forend and gas piston. You could substitute one of gunplumber's U.S. made copies of the flashhider, Falcon Arms magazine floorplates, followers if it takes metric magazines or one of the folding cocking handles, if you can find the correct version somewhere.

owlcreekok
June 10, 2007, 05:37
There was a protracted discussion on here once upon a time concerning the piston length and / or having some "clearance" between it and the bolt carrier. This was WAY before my time on here. I heard about it fairly recently and I ended up doing a search and failed. A local Fal'er told me about it. Something to do with "timing dwell" and a clearance between piston tail and bolt carrier to facilitate same. We tossed it around ourselves and decided that we personally will set ours up so that the piston tail is flush within a thou' or three plus or minus. A clearance makes no sense to us other than a means for the piston to peen itself against the carrier's face.

Entirely an opinion and respectfully submitted, of course. :angel:

bykerhd
June 10, 2007, 08:47
Just reporting along what I had read sometime back myself owl.
I believe EMD II was the source of the information.
I wasn't going to argue with HIM on a technical issue.

I can see it from the standpoint that you will in fact start the process of driving the bolt carrier back with an impact as opposed to a push. Seems like it might promote more positive extraction. Of course everything has it's price. In this case I would imagine either the piston or carrier will eventually show some wear or damage from the impacts.

I haven't worried much about allowing for it on mine. Hasn't really been an issue, that I can see.

J. Armstrong
June 10, 2007, 08:49
Receiver markings seem to indicate an Imbel receiver.

I believe Gunplumber has US folding cocking handles.

bykerhd
June 10, 2007, 09:46
I don't think that is an Imbel receiver J. Armstrong.
The Imbels I've seen are marked Itajuba Brazil.
His sounds like a standard late model U.S. Century receiver.
A close up of the receiver markings would settle the issue.

Texxut
June 10, 2007, 14:00
It is a Century receiver, complete with the unibrow feed ramp. Built on an Austrailian lower and barrel. I've heard much negative about both Century and the unibrow feed ramp, but I must be living right, because the rifle has functioned well from the get go. Feeds/fires/extracts& ejects with no problems. The only questions I have about the rifle are the US parts and learning about the specifics of the FAL. I'm new to FAL rifles. I'll get some floorplates and I think that will square me with the silly laws.
(Take off this perfectly good part and put on this other perfectly good part, excellent, now it's a nice rifle instead of an evil weapon of the devil. Our government, hard at work, protecting us from ourselves. At least I know my tax dollars are not being wasted.) :mad:

Back to the piston length. Flush or just poking out? Below flush does not sound like a good idea, as it makes sense that hammering the carrier or piston is going to accelerate wear.

J. Armstrong
June 10, 2007, 14:28
Righto - my three Century import receivers are indeed marked Imbel at varying places ( although the one I'm looking at now does not say Itajuba anywhere, curiously enough ).

Looking at a couple factory rifles, all of mine have the piston flush with or very, very slightly recessed from the back face of the receiver. Protruding may allow the carrier to batter the piston when returning to battery, just as too much recess wopuld seem to allow the piston to batter against the carrier upon firing.

Texxut
June 10, 2007, 14:32
So flush is the way to go.

Radio
June 10, 2007, 17:30
Hey, that's right, Owl-chit-san, I remember that old thread. Somebody was arguing that there should be an "air gap" between the piston and the carrier. Others said that merely introduces unnecessary "slap" to the parts when the gas system cycles. As I remember it, the final word was to have as little gap as possible, however it was better to HAVE a gap than for the piston to extend out too far.

--Radio