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View Full Version : Reloading setup - what am I missing?


English Mike
December 11, 2006, 14:53
I'm getting ready for when I start reloading next year & this is what I either have, or is on order:

Rifle die set .270 1
Crimp die .270 1
Die set .38/.357 1
Case trimmer 1
Case trim gauge .357 1
Case trim gauge .38spl 1
Case trim gauge .270 1
Sizing wax 1
Reloading tray .270 2
Reloading tray .357-.38 2
Digital calliper 1
Stoney Point OAL gauge 1
Stoney Point modified case .270 1
Rockchucker Press 1
Hand Priming tool 1
Scales 1
Powder measure 1
Powder funnel 1
Deburring tool 1
Primer pocket cleaner 1
Powder trickler 1
Check weights 1
Stoney Point Bullet comparator 1
Reloading books 2

Now what else do I need & are there any items that aren't necessary but make things easier/faster?

I reckon on about 2,000 pistol caliber & 200 rifle caliber a year to start with.

TIA

Mike

Muggzy
December 11, 2006, 15:09
digital micrometer is a big help if it isn't on the list


somethin else that helps I use those plastic trays that frozen dinners come in. They are handy for dumping your brass in and then working from those but that is just me and the way I do it.


Missed it the first round...it is on your list


look like your ready to go or soon will be. It is most satisfying to load and fire your own ammo.....specially when you blast the bullseye out of something or
take down a game animal...not sure what it is about that....make ya feel good
though

Old Sarge
December 11, 2006, 15:12
Hay ya Mike
I have been loading for years and there some stuff on there that I have never heard of let alone used.


Reloading tray .357-.38 2 = I have some trays but rarely use them. For the pistols brass I use a small box.

Case trim gauge .357 1
Case trim gauge .38spl 1
Case trim gauge .270 1= While I have a couple of the trim gauges I never use them. I found it to hard to get an accurate idea of what I was trying to read. Easyer to use the calipers and get a mesuremnt for lenth.

Stoney Point OAL gauge 1 = For overal lenth I just use my calipers. Once the die is set you shouldn't have to check each and every round.

Stoney Point modified case .270 = Never heard of it. What dose it do?

Check weights 1 = You mean the weights to check the accuracy of the scale? I don't have and have never used them. Bullet of a known weight seems to work ok. The one time they would have been nice to have, I could tell just looking at the volume of powder that the scale was off. Sent the scale back to RCBS and they rebuilt it for free.

Maybe I am doing somthing wrong but never had a lot of issues with out any of the above.

YMMV
Old Sarge

ftierson
December 11, 2006, 16:03
Mike,

Sounds like you have it pretty well covered...

I'm assuming that you aren't shooting the .270Win. in a semi-auto, so you don't really need the bullet crimp die...

I never crimp the bullet in any ammo destined to be shot in bolt guns...

Forrest

English Mike
December 11, 2006, 16:05
"Case trim gauge .357 1
Case trim gauge .38spl 1
Case trim gauge .270 1= While I have a couple of the trim gauges I never use them. I found it to hard to get an accurate idea of what I was trying to read. Easyer to use the calipers and get a mesuremnt for lenth.

Stoney Point OAL gauge 1 = For overal lenth I just use my calipers. Once the die is set you shouldn't have to check each and every round.

Stoney Point modified case .270 = Never heard of it. What dose it do?"

Hi Sarge

The "case trim gauges" are parts of the Lee case cutter & ensure it trims to the correct length.

The Stoney point OAL gauge works with the modified case so that I can set the bullet's ogive at the required distance from the lands with different types - a bit anal I know but sometimes I'm like that;)

Greensborobob
December 11, 2006, 17:41
Only thing I didn't see on the list was a tumbler.

newfalguy101
December 11, 2006, 18:45
I use the Hornady reloading trays, they are two sided and fit a huge number of calibers instead of being caliber specific, I have two of them.

As mentioned a tumbler with media

might also want to stock up on those plastic ammo boxes

I have wanted to try one of those stoney point OAL guages for awhile, just never willing to pony up the bucks.

The disadvantage of using the caliper method of OAL ( which I DO use ) is the bullet tips will sometimes be damaged, ergo your OAL is NOT cosistent, the ogive should NEVER change from bullet to bullet.

English Mike
December 11, 2006, 20:08
Yeah, I know about the tumbler - trouble is that we're on 220/240 volts here & I'm too tight to pay double the US price via Midway UK for the correct one. They're a little too bulky for shipping, so my brother's old stone polisher is going to be tried for suitability (NOT with the abrasives:tongue: ).

xfrk
December 11, 2006, 20:22
How about a primer pocket cleaning tool (hand held). I don't know much about reloading, but I recently helped a friend reload some milsurp 7.62x51 that I ran through my fal. He wanted to show me how its done and give me some pointers on good equipment. Anyway, he reamed all of the primer pockets before reloading. Is this necessary? The pockets did seem cleaner.

newfalguy101
December 11, 2006, 20:29
Originally posted by xfrk
How about a primer pocket cleaning tool (hand held). I don't know much about reloading, but I recently helped a friend reload some milsurp 7.62x51 that I ran through my fal. He wanted to show me how its done and give me some pointers on good equipment. Anyway, he reamed all of the primer pockets before reloading. Is this necessary? The pockets did seem cleaner.

perhaps he was removing the crimp????

if that is what he was doing then, yes, its needed.

You can seat new primers without reaming, but the pucker factor is pretty high as you have to use quite a bit of pressure on the primer to get it to seat!!!!!

jerico941
December 11, 2006, 22:20
more stuff: precision tweezers, small brush, dental pick, hex wrenches, magnifying glass, compressed air, lock out die (important for pistol), die wrench, extra decapping pins,-

Indycar
December 11, 2006, 22:33
Screw the wimpy RCBS tumbler get a man's tumbler a DILLON. PS they are available in Eurovoltage

MAINER
December 12, 2006, 10:57
Widgits, you can never have enough Widgits when reloadin! ;)

One small thing missin that I noticed is a "Chamfer & Deburring Tool" for your cases after trimming.

I'd say you've got a real nice setup there.

Have fun! :)

English Mike
December 12, 2006, 14:41
Primer pocket cleaner & chamfeing tool are both in the list:tongue: :biggrin:

Thanks all for checking the list.

I HAVE noticed I forgot a bullet puller for the inevitable visit from Mr Cockup:uhoh:

ftierson
December 12, 2006, 16:05
I also notice that you have 2 reloading books on your list...

Buy every one that you can find...

That's more than two...

:)

Forrest

Para Driver
December 12, 2006, 17:07
I prefer (highly recommend) the Lee 'factory crimp' dies... they uniformly pinch the neck rather than roll the brass..

and you might look into taper crimp dies for the 38/357 as well... pretty useful on a semi pistol, but may not be what you want for a revolver load.

English Mike
December 12, 2006, 20:55
Originally posted by Para Driver
I prefer (highly recommend) the Lee 'factory crimp' dies... they uniformly pinch the neck rather than roll the brass..

and you might look into taper crimp dies for the 38/357 as well... pretty useful on a semi pistol, but may not be what you want for a revolver load.

Yep, the .270 crimp die is the Lee FCD & the Lee .357 die set has the FCD included.
The .357 loads will be for a Marlin 1894 & an 'orrible object unique to the UK, known as a "long Barreled Revolver"

MAINER
December 13, 2006, 12:15
:redface: Sorry, missed that one!

OK, one other thing. Noticed you have Imperial die sizing wax. Good stuff and I've used it for years, but it's not up to snuff for heavy case sizing. IMHO. Tried it again last night for 7.62x51 CAVIM cases and had to go back to RCBS II lube.

Cases probably fired in Machine Gun as it takes a lot of force to resize head area. RCBS dies And Rockchucker. Almost stuck 4 or 5 cases in the sizer die with the wax before giving up.

RCBS II is water soluable and cleans up nice and quick.

Have heard Hornady and RCBS lube spray works well but haven't used them myself.

Hopefully you won't need a "Stuck Case Remover" :cry:

G'luck and be sure to post pics of your first "One Hole" groups.

Mainer

ftierson
December 13, 2006, 13:28
Originally posted by MAINER
OK, one other thing. Noticed you have Imperial die sizing wax. Good stuff and I've used it for years, but it's not up to snuff for heavy case sizing. IMHO. Tried it again last night for 7.62x51 CAVIM cases and had to go back to RCBS II lube.

RCBS II is water soluable and cleans up nice and quick.


I don't want to sound like a RCBS commercial here, but I agree about the RCBS Case Lube II stuff...

I've been using the RCBS Case Lube since before there was a II...

The original stuff was good, but hard to clean up...

The RCBS Case Lube II is great stuff and really easy to clean off the cases. For example, when sizing 5.56x45mm cases, I usually size them in batches of 500. After finishing sizing a few batches, I then wash the cases off in soapy hot water before trimming and throwing them into the tumbler.

I have also tried the Imperial sizing wax. I used a whole 'tin' of it, so that's a fair number of cases. I even have a couple of new tins of it laying in reserve. It works OK, but the RCBS II is better...

At least, that's what I think...

:)

Forrest

kennaquhair
December 13, 2006, 14:50
Pretty complete kit and good solid choices. If you are are looking to lavish attention on each of those .270 cases you might add a flash hole uniforming/deburring tool to the list.

English Mike
December 13, 2006, 15:04
Originally posted by MAINER


G'luck and be sure to post pics of your first "One Hole" groups.

Mainer

Well, I reckon that if I fire 2-300 rounds at the same target, it'll be pretty much one big hole - does that count?:biggrin:

Just had a box of stuff donated by one of my customers as well - haven't had time to see what's there, except that there's RCBS rifle dies in .308 & .243

I guess I'd better think about justifying them;)

owlcreekok
December 13, 2006, 15:11
I just went thru the throes of deciding whether or not to buy some Factory Crimp dies. The deciding factor was that I have loaded and fired thousands of rounds without them. Going for another 20 plus years sans them, so it looks. YMMV.

I see BUFF has a coupla posts showing Natchez' current deal on the RCBS master kit. That is just unbelievable. I may buy one and leave it in the box for hard times.

bykerhd
December 13, 2006, 15:29
Get one of the impact(hammer) type bullet pullers from RCBS, Midway or Dillon. It will work fine for small lots of ammo and is about the only type that will work on handgun ammo. The Forster collet types are great for jacketed rifle bullets but I wouldn't bother to pick one up unless you find a super deal on one. You shouldn't have that many screw-ups.

Hornady makes a conversion bushing for the RCBS Rockchuckers. Intall it and you can then use the Lock-N-Load bushings on your reloading dies. Instead of having to use a wrench initially and then unscrew dies the rest of the way by hand, you only have to turn them about 1/2 ? a turn and lift the dies out. Makes changing dies on a single station press much less of an onerous task.

owlcreekok
December 13, 2006, 15:57
Not going to hijack this, but Byker,,,you happen to own one of those L n L Hornady rigs ? They kinda interest me. Arguably, more so than a Dillon.

English Mike
December 13, 2006, 16:04
Hijack away Owl - it's all interesting to me:cool:

newfalguy101
December 13, 2006, 18:40
I have been using the Hornady "One Shot" case lube for several years and have very good luck with it, never seen any need to use anything else ( NOTE: I do not do any wild-cats or case forming )

Greensborobob
December 13, 2006, 19:38
I've had 2 stuck cases, both with the Hornady One Shot.

Admittedly they were user error for either poor distribution or too much time elapsed.

If you do stick a case come back to the forum because you can duplicate the remover for half the cost with common hardware materials.

I use the Imperiel Wax because you wipe it off with a dry towel rather than a wet one. My set up is in the garage and this makes a difference if its cool.

bykerhd
December 13, 2006, 21:53
Owl, I have the conversion bushings in two Rockchuckers. I'm still setting up dies. Other projects, mainly the home remodeling job from Hell, have kept me too busy the last several months to do much loading and exploit the Lock-N-Load's potential. But, they really do seem to work well and youi are less likely to disturb die adjustments as very little force is required to change dies.
You just have to unscrew the large threaded bushing from the top of the Rockchucker and then thread in the conversion piece. Then you are good to go. Converting back would be just as easy if for some strange reason it was desired. The die bushings can get expensive. Midway has them. I'm not sure where else they might be found.

owlcreekok
December 13, 2006, 22:40
Cool, thanks Byker.

Bob, I learned how to get a stuck case out one night before a silouette match. I HAD to get a wildcat (7 TCU) case out of a die. I still have that contraption in one of the bench boxes. Hasn't been used in a few years. (rap head thrice) 1/4 x 20 tap, 1/4 x 20 bolt and a few assorted washers-bushings.

jerico941
December 13, 2006, 23:43
Re: bullet pullers-I used the kinetic (hammer)type for years-switched to the bullet pulling die and it is a far superior way to go-If you make a mistake with 20 rounds you can disassemble all of them in a few minutes. I have mine mounted in the Partner $50.00 ) press and it always ready to undo my fu's

Greensborobob
December 14, 2006, 10:13
OC.

Yep - tap, bolt, 2 flat washers and a 1/2" emt conduit connector.

brownknees
December 14, 2006, 11:34
Notebook & pen/pencil.
You'll have to look up old or test data sooner or later & this is a great way to do it.
Or if you want to get really anal try a spreadsheet in excel with all the items you'd ever want to look up as column headings. That way you can sort by things like OAL, seating depth, pressure vs velocity Etc.

k7kit
December 15, 2006, 18:17
Originally posted by ftierson
I also notice that you have 2 reloading books on your list...

Buy every one that you can find...

That's more than two...

:)

Forrest


I agree, even old one's. I have a couple of old Lyman books and a Ackley one I could not live without. The 'load books' for each individual caliber are a good resourse as well.

owlcreekok
December 16, 2006, 00:01
Mike, try to find some loading blocks other than those kind RCBS has. Them is some aggravatin' bastages. Every other hole is different from the adjacent one. One has a smaller bottom. I think they were trying to make an 80 hole block with 40 holes for one size and 40 for another. With cases like the 270 you gonna use four cases per row. FOUR BLEEMING CASES ! SHIT ! I like loading in lots that are multiples of FIVE. Who da heck uses FOUR ????

:rofl:


Some smaller based cases work okay in all the slots, but they are so close together ya can't do nuthin to them while they in the block. Also, the holes are too shallow.

I like the ONE block I got made by MTM. IIRC is is called a "Twin 60" Two sided affair. One side has smaller holes than the other. Deeper holes and spaced ALMOST enough you can get a powder funnel on a case while in it fairly well.

I used to make a few out of wood using the drill press, but that is a lot of trouble and I broke my last Forstner bit. :cry: (Forstners make a flat bottomed hole)

Just my rant about loading blocks. You called them "trays", but we unnerstan you is a Brit and don't know no better. :wink:

shootist87122
December 16, 2006, 10:48
Got Pilots for the case trimmer?

Deburring tool? New rifle brass should be sized and deburred first for best results. (No need to deburr new pistol brass).

Are you setup for seating both large and small primers? The .270 will be large primer and the .38/357 will be small primer.

jerrymrc
December 16, 2006, 12:43
I got the all night loadin press blues
Loadin everything I own cept my shoes
Got primers in the loader and they ain't done yet
Brass in the trimmer and it ain't trimmed yet
If you shoot guns ya gotta pay the dues
At the all night loadin press blues (yes you do)
At the all night loadin press blues.

Apologies to Joe Walsh.:biggrin: