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nanshadao
April 11, 2002, 05:47
Just got another G-1 kit. Am making black walnut furniture for the rifle and am now trying to decide how to finish the metal. I have two that I parked and painted. This one, I am thinking bluing. Typical chemical bluing seems to have problems with metal hardness variations. So, I am thinking slow rust blue. What it needed to do a home setup for slow rust blueing? Who makes the best chems for the job?

blackbird
April 11, 2002, 06:28
You will need:

1) a vessel large enough to boil water that will fit the largest part you have.

2) Oil/Fragrance/Emollient-free cotton balls or swabs

3) oil-free steel wool (available from woodworking sources or you can degrease the common variety with some effort) AND/OR brownell's excellent carding brushes.

4) A source of de-ionized water (bottled from supermarket or home de-ionizer unit)

Optionally, you can "card" (i.e. remove excess oxide between coats) using an adjustable speed bench grinder with a very fine (.003-.005 diameter bristles) wire wheel.

As far as chemicals, I am very satisfied with Pilkington's American Classic Rust Blue from Brownell's. Expensive but you can do many rifles from a single bottle. I like it better than Herters "Belgian" blue.

Alleycat
April 11, 2002, 06:37
Go to "Choices of finishs" right here in Gunsmithing and read what blackbird writes. This is not the slow (fume) bluing. Is hot water rust bluing, also called Belgium Bluing. You get a matt black finish and don't have the hard spot problems you wrote of.

Alleycat
April 11, 2002, 06:43
Blackbird types mush faster than I do!

Alleycat
April 11, 2002, 06:49
Mush? Ment much.

blackbird
April 11, 2002, 11:52
Originally posted by Alleycat:
<STRONG>This is not the slow (fume) bluing. Is hot water rust bluing, also called Belgium Bluing.</STRONG>

Alleycat, is of course correct. Fume bluing would require a fume box (best made from acrylic), respiratory protection and a small amount of Hydrochloric and Nitric acids. The reagent grade versions of these are generally unavailable to the public, particularly the nitric, but if you have contacts in the academia (chemistry lab) you might be able to arrange for some. You literally use only a few drops of the stuff per gun. Of course, any time you are dealing with acids in these concentrations, with the attendant fumes, it is best to have adequate facilities devoid of children and pets.

I've chosen the Pilkington "hot water" rust blue over the fume blue for convenience, safety and because the results have similar durability and depth. I still use the fume blue every once in a blue moon for restoration when it is consistent with the original finish.

sledgehammer
April 11, 2002, 15:27
I like and use the Pinkington's American Rust Blue as well. It leaves a nice translucent polished black finish which I find to be more rust resistant than hot blue because the metal has already gone through the rust process. Try it, you will like it.

panzer
April 11, 2002, 20:48
Originally posted by sledgehammer:
<STRONG>I like and use the Pinkington's American Rust Blue as well. It leaves a nice translucent polished black finish which I find to be more rust resistant than hot blue because the metal has already gone through the rust process. Try it, you will like it.</STRONG>


where do we find this elixer for steel?

masterwrench
April 11, 2002, 21:22
I have touted the virtues of Pilkingtons American rust blue for quite some time and have done several guns with it, for the FAL I have found that it is best to have the parts LIGHTLY bead blasted, this will remove all traces of the original finish and leave the metal with a Slightly rough finish. It is VERY important to degrease the lower reciever, cleaning with a highly volitile solvent like lacquer thinner will work, followed by boiling a couple of times in clean water. The rear block where the rat-tail goes through the reciever is a stubborn spot to degrease. Follow the directions in the booklet and you will be more than satisfied with the results. All the stuff you need is available from Brownells. Are you making your own stock?

blackbird
April 11, 2002, 21:49
Originally posted by panzer:
<STRONG>where do we find this elixer for steel?</STRONG>
www.brownells.com (http://www.brownells.com)

Much, much, much (did I mention... much?) nicer/durable than cold blues.

nanshadao
April 12, 2002, 05:39
Thanks for the info. I am making the stocks. I thought about ordering some unfinished, but decided to try my hand at making them from a block of lumber.

masterwrench
April 12, 2002, 21:44
When the stock is done post how it came out and how you did it