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MG-70
September 12, 2001, 11:56
Where can I easily find beeswax that's suitable for making that concoction for treating wood (to mix with linseed oil, and turpentine, if I remember correctly)?

TIA,
MG-70

Dave1
September 12, 2001, 12:33
May sound a bit wierd but check the local HDWE. store for the wax ring that seals the toilet to the plumbing. It's very soft and I believe it's a mix of bee's wax and parifin.
Dave

Blag
September 12, 2001, 12:40
Check craft supply places, they sell beeswax for making candles.

Also lumberyards, cabinetmakers use beeswax to lube screws and hardware sometimes.

And you can find it online, mostly sold for candle making. A Google search for "beeswax" and "candle" gives mucho links.

Wright Brothers Gunsmiths
September 12, 2001, 14:49
Bees seem to have a good supply. Try bee keepers in your area. That's where I get mine.
Lewis

Levin
September 12, 2001, 15:42
Places like "Hobby Lobby" and other craft stores have it in the candle making section.

The potion you mentioned is what I use on my Nagants and other C&Rs, one part each: bees wax, linseed oil, turpentine. It makes a nice paste, a little softer than shoe polish, but it firms up nicely over time. A baby food jar is just the right size for holding a batch.

Levin
September 12, 2001, 15:44
P.S. This hardly needs to be said, but remember to extinguish all flames before mixing in the turpentine.

MG-70
September 12, 2001, 20:40
Levin,
Thanks for the reminder, I'm using an electric range...it's what's available.

Don't have any babies (that I know of), you talkin' the little 3" tall, circular, glass receptacles?
1) How many stocks is that good for? It'll be my first application on bare wood -- K98;
2) How much ingredients for filling said container?

Thank you all for the tips on the sources for wax. Lewis, I tried to catch a few with my fishtank net but they weren't very cooperative :p , I'll try one of the retail outlets.

Thanks,
MG-70

[ September 12, 2001: Message edited by: MG-70 ]

[ September 12, 2001: Message edited by: MG-70 ]

Levin
September 13, 2001, 03:26
MG-70, a small batch should last years on a dozen rifles. Actually, I'm not using a baby food jar either, but it was the best way to describe it. The jar I'm using was from a jar of dry yeast (bread baking). About 3 inches tall, same size, shape, and volume as a baby food jar. Use anything you like, but if it's too tall or neck too narrow, you will have a hard time digging it out.

While you're at it, may as well whip up some "Ed's Red":
1 part ATF transmission fluid
1 part kerosene
1 part Mineral Spirits (or turpentine)
1 part acetone
Do some web searching for history and variations on the mixture. This is what I use to clean up kits and flushing out my HKs, and some general cleaning. I still use various lubes and bore cleaners, but this stuff is cheap and you can slosh it around and use liberally for flushing. Really tared up kit parts can be pickled in it for an easy clean up.

StirFry
September 13, 2001, 04:09
So what's the beeswax concoction used for? polishing?

also, how's acetone with skin contact?

Originally posted by Levin:
<STRONG>MG-70, a small batch should last years on a dozen rifles. Actually, I'm not using a baby food jar either, but it was the best way to describe it. The jar I'm using was from a jar of dry yeast (bread baking). About 3 inches tall, same size, shape, and volume as a baby food jar. Use anything you like, but if it's too tall or neck too narrow, you will have a hard time digging it out.

While you're at it, may as well whip up some "Ed's Red":
1 part ATF transmission fluid
1 part kerosene
1 part Mineral Spirits (or turpentine)
1 part acetone
Do some web searching for history and variations on the mixture. This is what I use to clean up kits and flushing out my HKs, and some general cleaning. I still use various lubes and bore cleaners, but this stuff is cheap and you can slosh it around and use liberally for flushing. Really tared up kit parts can be pickled in it for an easy clean up.</STRONG>

hsp223
September 13, 2001, 09:16
Please don't use the paste on bare wood, put down a few coats of Tung oil or linseed oil first. Tung oil is prefered as it will harden while linseed oil will not. Then use the paste to polish. If you use the paste on bare wood it will not penetrate very deep and a nick or gouge will expose the bare wood to the elements. HTH