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juntau
May 29, 2006, 18:32
Who is the person that does the Izzy Builds? I was reading a topic on it here but forgot what the subject it was under. The topic mentioned Azex but also had another name with pics of two builds.

J. Armstrong
May 29, 2006, 20:00
No reason any of the FALsmiths here couldn't do a great Izzy - I built my own as a first build years ago, so with luck even an all thumbs amateur can do well !!!!Sledgehammer has done excellent work on several of my other builds and I have seen pix of some gorgeous Izzies from Gunplumber, as well as from Derek. All three have reputations for nice work. I am sure there are others, but these folks come to mind at the moment.

Windustsearch
May 31, 2006, 11:42
I bet the pics you remember are the Arizona Response Systems ones.

Blood of Tyrants
May 31, 2006, 19:53
What is the diff between an Izzy and any other FAL? Parts is parts.

Abominog
June 01, 2006, 07:14
Originally posted by Blood of Tyrants
What is the diff between an Izzy and any other FAL? Parts is parts.


Front site
Barrel thread pitch
receiver pin


Small maybe, but could present difficulties to those with limited experience or tools.

MasterGunner
June 01, 2006, 22:04
No. Iraeli FAL's are not the same as the standard metrics.

First, Israeli barrel threads (breech end) are slightly different than the standard 1-16 TPI pitch used on both metric and inch pattern barrels.

Second, Israeli gas blocks are much heavier in construction than the metric and use a shorter gas plug with Hebrew markings. Israeli front sights have a square base around the tapered post and use a unique front sight spring. A special combination wrench is required to adjust the sight; the standard FN metric sight adjusting tool will not work.

Third, Israeli gas pistons are slightly longer than standard metric or inch pattern.

Fourth, Israeli handguards are stamped steel with wooden panels. They are extremely robust. The light barrel handguards require two spacers that go around the gas piston tube; the heavy barrel uses only one. The spacers keep the wooden handguards from being crushed against the barrel and/or gas piston tube.

Fifth, Israeli magazine catches have a burr or ring shape. No other metric magazine catch looks like them.

Sixth, Israeli lowers are marked in Hebrew and are positioned opposite (appearing upsidedown in relation) to the metric markings. Israeli safety selectors come in semi-auto only and full auto. Each takes a C-ring retainer clip and have a very distinctive shape.

Seventh, the Israeli rear sight aperture is the tallest of the metric rear sight apertures. Light barrel sight slides are for 600 meters; heavy barrel sight slides are for 700 meters.

Eighth, Israeli stocks may be found with or without the stock ferrule at the small of the stock. Israeli light barrel butt plates are stamped steel; the heavy barrel butt stock has a hinged butt plate like the M14 rifle. Israeli butt swivels (for attaching the lower end of the sling) come in five pieces: two screws, a lower plate, the butt swivel, and the upper retainer plate.

Ninth, Israeli carrying handles on the heavy barrel guns are very robust and may be either wood or plastic. They face the opposite direction as the standard carrying handle. Light barrel carrying handles are wood (early) or the standard FN plastic.

Tenth, Israeli heavy barrel guns arre equiped with folding, non-adjusting bipods. Flash suppressors may be either the 5-slot type or similar to the "combination device" with the rows of angled holes. The Israeli heavy barrel gun is the tactical equivalent of the FN FALO or Browning Automatic Rifle (BAR).

Eleventh: Israeli light or heavy barrel rifles use the vertical take down lever. They may be found with wooden pistol grips (early production) or the black plastic grips found on later FN production. No pistol grip cleaning kit is used.

Twelfth, Israeli upper receivers are marked with the IDF shield and in Hebrew on left and right sides and on the right side of the magazine well. Both Type 1 and Type 2 metric receivers may be found. Magazines are metric pattern with a Hebrew letters in a circular cartouche.

Thirteenth, Israeli light barrels may be found without a flash suppressor and use the FN Type A bayonet with the two prongs attached to the muzzle ring. The bayonet is designed to act as a flash suppressor at night and is spring-loaded to compensate for point-of-impact changes caused by firing the rifle with and without the bayonet fixed. Later Israeli barrels are found with the FN "combination device" and take the FN tubular bayonet with offset blade.

Now, parts may be parts, but Israeli FALs have many parts unique only to them.

:fal:

rochte
June 01, 2006, 23:32
[Sorry to hijack the thread for a moment...]

On the topic of Izzy differences... I had an original IDF light barrel FAL (not an SBL - a genuine IDF rifle), serial number 57xxxx (I have the full number around here somewhere and have no problem posting it later). It had NO finish remaining and had obviously been through hell and back.

Unlike the Armscorp and Onyx SBL imports (and later "clones" by GP and others), it had ONE handguard spacer, not two. The handguards were cut for two, but it was clear that only one had ever been installed. (HGs were the early type with no plastic inserts and seemed slightly smaller than the later style as well.)

According to all references that I could find at the time (early '90s), the serial indicated that the receiver was built in 1957 (it was a Herstal type 1). Is that "early"? IIRC, it was adopted in '55, so it seems pretty early to me...

Nonetheless, both the pg and the carry handle were plastic - beat-to-crap with huge gouges and polished-smooth-from-use plastic, but plastic, not wood.

So on at least these two points - number of spacers and wood vs plastic on "early" models - does anyone have any actual references to substantiate the conventional wisdom about what is "correct" on a LB Izzy?

(BTW, my rifle later became the property of my dear Uncle Sam - thankfully, he was in a forgiving mood and simply accepted my donation with no further complications....)

Windustsearch
June 02, 2006, 12:20
Everything I have read or seen suggests plastic grips and carry handles. The spacers, either or.

juntau
June 03, 2006, 23:14
Your were right Windustsearch, it's Mark T. Graham from ARS

Blood of Tyrants
June 04, 2006, 16:12
Originally posted by Blood of Tyrants
What is the diff between an Izzy and any other FAL? Parts is parts.

My point was that it is still a FAL variant and any 'smith here ought to be able to take care of you.

Headshot
June 11, 2006, 17:36
"Eleventh: Israeli light or heavy barrel rifles use the vertical take down lever."

Later Izzy rifles have been observed with horizonal take down levers as well. I decided to use a horizontal on a type II Izzy with the belief that this would be more correct?

:beer:

sparkeyboaz
April 05, 2017, 02:15
No. Iraeli FAL's are not the same as the standard metrics.

First, Israeli barrel threads (breech end) are slightly different than the standard 1-16 TPI pitch used on both metric and inch pattern barrels.

Second, Israeli gas blocks are much heavier in construction than the metric and use a shorter gas plug with Hebrew markings. Israeli front sights have a square base around the tapered post and use a unique front sight spring. A special combination wrench is required to adjust the sight; the standard FN metric sight adjusting tool will not work.

Third, Israeli gas pistons are slightly longer than standard metric or inch pattern.

Fourth, Israeli handguards are stamped steel with wooden panels. They are extremely robust. The light barrel handguards require two spacers that go around the gas piston tube; the heavy barrel uses only one. The spacers keep the wooden handguards from being crushed against the barrel and/or gas piston tube.

Fifth, Israeli magazine catches have a burr or ring shape. No other metric magazine catch looks like them.

Sixth, Israeli lowers are marked in Hebrew and are positioned opposite (appearing upsidedown in relation) to the metric markings. Israeli safety selectors come in semi-auto only and full auto. Each takes a C-ring retainer clip and have a very distinctive shape.

Seventh, the Israeli rear sight aperture is the tallest of the metric rear sight apertures. Light barrel sight slides are for 600 meters; heavy barrel sight slides are for 700 meters.

Eighth, Israeli stocks may be found with or without the stock ferrule at the small of the stock. Israeli light barrel butt plates are stamped steel; the heavy barrel butt stock has a hinged butt plate like the M14 rifle. Israeli butt swivels (for attaching the lower end of the sling) come in five pieces: two screws, a lower plate, the butt swivel, and the upper retainer plate.

Ninth, Israeli carrying handles on the heavy barrel guns are very robust and may be either wood or plastic. They face the opposite direction as the standard carrying handle. Light barrel carrying handles are wood (early) or the standard FN plastic.

Tenth, Israeli heavy barrel guns arre equiped with folding, non-adjusting bipods. Flash suppressors may be either the 5-slot type or similar to the "combination device" with the rows of angled holes. The Israeli heavy barrel gun is the tactical equivalent of the FN FALO or Browning Automatic Rifle (BAR).

Eleventh: Israeli light or heavy barrel rifles use the vertical take down lever. They may be found with wooden pistol grips (early production) or the black plastic grips found on later FN production. No pistol grip cleaning kit is used.

Twelfth, Israeli upper receivers are marked with the IDF shield and in Hebrew on left and right sides and on the right side of the magazine well. Both Type 1 and Type 2 metric receivers may be found. Magazines are metric pattern with a Hebrew letters in a circular cartouche.

Thirteenth, Israeli light barrels may be found without a flash suppressor and use the FN Type A bayonet with the two prongs attached to the muzzle ring. The bayonet is designed to act as a flash suppressor at night and is spring-loaded to compensate for point-of-impact changes caused by firing the rifle with and without the bayonet fixed. Later Israeli barrels are found with the FN "combination device" and take the FN tubular bayonet with offset blade.

Now, parts may be parts, but Israeli FALs have many parts unique only to them.

:fal:
This is the kind of info I am in need of!
Sparkeyboaz