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View Full Version : Norrell's Moly Resin vs. KG Gun Kote


perdurabo
March 27, 2002, 12:23
I need opinions on which bake-on finish to start out with. Which comes more highly recommended? easier to work with? gives nicest finish?

From scanning the boards, it looks like more people seem to be complaining about the durability of Gun-Kote than Norrells. But with Gun-Kote being twice as cheap as Norrell's per unit of volume, is the supposed added durability of Norrell's worth it?

I am about to build a G1 kit onto one of the new Imbel non-gear-logo receivers from AIM. Since its probably best practice to barrel and headspace the receiver before refinishing, will I have to sandblast the already-finished receiver to do the barrel? Wont the finish/sandblast screw up important surfaces like the locking shoulder and chamber mouth? Im afraid of knocking off my headspace by sandblasting finishing and heating the receiver.

What is the exact procedure most people use for finishing an already barreled receiver that came pre-finished such that they both match? Exactly what parts of the entire receiver/barrel assembly need to come off and be finished separately and which need to be covered/protected from sandblasting and finish and what do you use to protect them?

Thanks in advance for any help you can give.

TideWater 41009
March 27, 2002, 13:06
I have had great results with Brownell's teflon-moly. In my opinion, it is at least as durable as any other finish and there is virtually no finish build-up. Just follow the directions for perfect results.

There is usually no need to, but if you want to pre-heat the parts before applying the teflon moly, don't heat them over 100 degrees or so. Otherwise the coating dries too fast and just sits on top of the metal. If the metal is cooler, the finish seems to penetrate better before it dries (my theory) and sticks better and lasts longer.

It is always best to finish the rifle after barreling and headspacing. You can plug the bore with rubber stoppers (available at most hardware stores). You can put a piece of duct tape over any surfaces you don't want sand blasted (such as the locking sholder), but there is usually no need to do this if you are careful with the sand blaster.

The barrel/receiver/locking shoulder should be finished as a unit. All other parts should be removed and completely dissassembled, then painted and baked.

Teflon moly can be used over clean, bare metal or parerizing (no need to sandblast the new receiver), but will not stick to blueing or old paint.

Baking the parts afterward at the recommended temperature will not affect the headspacing in any way.

Sean
March 27, 2002, 14:00
Hello,

One small bit of info that will help is:

1: Clean/degrease parts.

2: Place parts in oven and bring heat up to the 300 to 325 degrees needed to cure the Moly Resin. The reason for this is that there will be some hidden oil or grease that the 125 pre-heat temp will not show.

3: Pull parts out and check for oil and contamination.

4: Clean/degrease parts again (after they cool).

5: Set oven for 125 degrees and preheat parts.

6: Pull parts out and spray them with the Moly Resin. (If parst cool down, put them back in the pre-heated oven.)

7: Repeat as needed.

8: Once all parts are coated, set oven for 300 degrees and timer for 1 hour.

9: Sit back, eagerly wait for parts to cure, have a beer, listen to wife complain about the smell, wish that the hour would go faster because you want to see the results and the wife is still complaining about the smell.

10: Open windows to get cross ventillation and remove smell from house.

11: Listen to wife complain about being cold now BUT... the smell is gone.

12: Check parts.

Other bits of advice.

A: Wear some type of glove so you do not get oil on the parts.

B: Do this outside and wear a respirator.

C: After the parts have cured, wipe any oils off the parts. You can sometimes wipe oils off but if you leave them on there as the parts cool the finish turns a blackish color.

D: Use an airbrush if possible.

E: Do step 2 above.

F: Don't let parts cool too much. Things like mags lose heat quicker than receivers due to mass and heat retention. If parts cool too much, the finish is not as nice.

G: On the flip side, DON'T heat the parts up too much and then spray on. Like Paul said, the finish doesn't stick as well. Pre-heat is 125 degrees.

H: Have fun.

Hope this helps and I'm sure I forgot a few things.

Respectfully,

Sean

perdurabo
March 27, 2002, 14:52
Originally posted by RefinishGuy/GunThings.com:
The barrel/receiver/locking shoulder should be finished as a unit. All other parts should be removed and completely dissassembled, then painted and baked.


What about the front sight/gas block? Wouldnt pulling this off screw up your timing, and probably scuff the barrel finish pounding it back on?


Teflon moly can be used over clean, bare metal or parerizing (no need to sandblast the new receiver), but will not stick to blueing or old paint.


Are both Norrell's Moly Resin and KG Gun Kote 2400 "Teflon" molys? If you leave the park on the receiver but sandblast the barrel, will the finish have a different texture on the receiver?

Gavin
March 27, 2002, 15:45
I have used both. I prefer norrell's
check my site (below) for Norrell's ordering info, and app. tips
Gavin

TideWater 41009
March 27, 2002, 22:11
Originally posted by perdurabo:
<STRONG>

Are both Norrell's Moly Resin and KG Gun Kote 2400 "Teflon" molys? If you leave the park on the receiver but sandblast the barrel, will the finish have a different texture on the receiver?</STRONG>

Definitely leave the gas block in place!

Can't say if Norrell's and KG are the same.

There will be very little difference in texture between the sandblasted bare steel and the parkerized steel. If you are concerned about it, I suppose you should sandblast everything down to bare steel for the sake of absolute uniformity. If it were my decision to make, I'd leave the park on though, since it makes the perfect primer for the teflon moly.

Gavin
March 27, 2002, 23:09
Norrell's is a phenolic resin, not teflon. So, no, they aren't the same. Phenolic resins are used in such products as brake pads and abrasive disks - very high abuse products (WAC... phenolic FAL RECEIVER?). Teflon is also a great substance, although dissimilar.
Gavin