PDA

View Full Version : Some Petrified Wood From New Mexico


Bug Tussell
February 25, 2006, 14:54
side shot with crystals ..

Bug Tussell
February 25, 2006, 14:56
end shot with some growth rings...

idsubgun
February 25, 2006, 15:37
I brought some back from Namibia, Africa. Not nearly as fancy as yours though. My professional hunter had a bunch on his farm. He had an area that he leaves untouched and has some really nice pieces and then he has an area that he allowed me to take a few samples back home with me.

Pretty cool stuff.

On a similar note, I also brought back a film container full of red sand from the Kalihari Desert. Cool stuff, I need to find a nice glass vial to put it in.

idsubgun
February 25, 2006, 16:01
You probably know much more then I do about this. This is my box of Africa rocks. Some petrified wood, and some other type rocks. That piece of what I think is Sandstone, was found in a dry river bed. That hole was bored by water, apparently, and is big enough to allow a mechanical pencil to pass through easily, with a bit of room to spare.
Do you see anything there of interest? Or can you tell me anything about them?

Bug Tussell
February 25, 2006, 19:37
Originally posted by idsubgun
You probably know much more then I do about this. This is my box of Africa rocks. Some petrified wood, and some other type rocks. That piece of what I think is Sandstone, was found in a dry river bed. That hole was bored by water, apparently, and is big enough to allow a mechanical pencil to pass through easily, with a bit of room to spare.
Do you see anything there of interest? Or can you tell me anything about them?

I'm no expert in this stuff. You might want to soak your rocks in water for a few days and give them a good brushing to clean them up - makes the beauty really come out. My neighbor, who got me into going out in the boondocks to look for rocks, generally gives them a good lick to wet them down - gives you an idea whay they would look like when polished. After he gives them a good lick he sometimes proclaims "tastes just like coyote piss"...

Whenever I find a rock with a bored hole in it I always wonder if it isn't' some kind of artifact - I know that bored holes can occur naturally but I tend to gravitate towards the manmade theory sometimes.

I've got some different samples of petrified wood that I have gathered - I'll try to post some more photos.

bykerhd
February 25, 2006, 20:52
You had me scared there !
I thought this was going to be a picture of some of the New Mexico FAL crowd displaying themselves in an inappropriate manner.
Never mind !

idsubgun
February 25, 2006, 21:02
Originally posted by Bug Tussell
You might want to soak your rocks in water for a few days and give them a good brushing to clean them up - makes the beauty really come out.


Whenever I find a rock with a bored hole in it I always wonder if it isn't' some kind of artifact - I know that bored holes can occur naturally but I tend to gravitate towards the manmade theory sometimes.



Soaking as we speak. That hole is so round that it looks like someone put it in there but how could you prove it?

Bug Tussell
February 25, 2006, 21:42
Originally posted by idsubgun


Soaking as we speak. That hole is so round that it looks like someone put it in there but how could you prove it?

Beats me...

Here is a shot of some of the variety of petrified wood that I collect about 12 miles from my house... there are several other varieties but these ones are inside and I don't feel like rummaging around in the dark...

notice the piece of chert with the hole... it may have occurred naturally or not... I don't know.

The piece at the top left may be petrified palm wood... the piece directly below it appears to be a nice size hunk of petrified tree resin/sap.

Pretty cool.

Bug Tussell
February 25, 2006, 21:44
Here is a closeup of a piece of PW with several wormholes in it...

Bug Tussell
February 25, 2006, 21:52
Here is a piece of PW with a couple worms in it... This piece I bought at the Museum of Natural History in Ogden, Utah. The museum also houses the Browning Arms Museum.

Bug Tussell
February 25, 2006, 21:59
Here is the PW with the worms circled...

Windustsearch
February 25, 2006, 22:52
Guys, bored holes are hourglass shaped in cross section. If the hole goes basically straight through it is probably natural. Looks like you might have a few artifacts in there ID.

0302
February 25, 2006, 23:43
i live just down the road from the petrified forest national park, so i went there to visit a few years ago, expecting to see significant amounts of amazing petrified wood, but most of it was gone because it was carried away by visitors, so its just an empty patch of desert now.

on a side note, there is still loads of pertified wood here in new mexico and arizona, i see entire petrified trees on the navajo rez and its still for sale at tourist traps along I40.

snolden
February 25, 2006, 23:48
0302, how close to Holbrook do you live? that is where I am at.

I have a waterfall in my pond built of the petrified wood that I dug up while building the pond. It is about 4 feet tall and about 2 feet wide. The pond is 10feet by 4' x 3' deep

yup it is everywhere up here. I got chunks that weigh probably 15 pounds easy.

Gary104
February 26, 2006, 01:12
This piece is from a gravel pit in nw Louisiana.

vmtz
February 26, 2006, 09:26
http://www.nmia.com/~daykin/san_felip_1.JPG

Ricketts
February 26, 2006, 13:52
Too bad about the Petrified Forest. I was there in '66 and they would have killed you for taking any. Had signs all over the place.

Guess as we have progressed in civilization and education, we just can't comprehend what we read.

Bwana John
February 26, 2006, 17:08
but most of it was gone because it was carried away by visitors, so its just an empty patch of desert now.
Actually the amount carted away by tourists pales in compairison to the amount quarried by gravel mining operations before the creation of the National Monument.

Petrified Forest National Park was doubled in size by G. W. in 2004 to better protect the geological and anthropological reasources of the area.

so its just an empty patch of desert now.
With all respects, did you get out of the car? The Park is over 315 sq miles, and there is still quite a bit left.

The Chinle Formation kicks ass, just try not to drink out of its springs!

Story
February 27, 2006, 14:35
Originally posted by idsubgun
You probably know much more then I do about this. This is my box of Africa rocks. Some petrified wood, and some other type rocks. That piece of what I think is Sandstone, was found in a dry river bed. That hole was bored by water, apparently, and is big enough to allow a mechanical pencil to pass through easily, with a bit of room to spare.
Do you see anything there of interest? Or can you tell me anything about them?

ID,
Go down the page to the STONE TUYERES and read about them -
http://www.namibiana.de/index.cfm?action=ViewDetails&ItemID=1834

However, yours looks like a digging stick stone, as it's too big to be an arrow weight.
http://www.kruger2canyons.com/stoneage.htm
The first groups of immigrants incorporated Khoi-San women into their society, and a smaller, darker stockier people, both of whom had the technology to produce medium sized bored stones and were users of these modified digging sticks.

Digging stick image
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16672/16672-h/images/p089.png

From The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to His Death, Volume I (of 2), 1866-1868, by David Livingstone
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16672/16672-h/16672-h.htm

idsubgun
February 27, 2006, 19:30
Originally posted by Story


ID,
Go down the page to the STONE TUYERES and read about them -
http://www.namibiana.de/index.cfm?action=ViewDetails&ItemID=1834

However, yours looks like a digging stick stone, as it's too big to be an arrow weight.
http://www.kruger2canyons.com/stoneage.htm
The first groups of immigrants incorporated Khoi-San women into their society, and a smaller, darker stockier people, both of whom had the technology to produce medium sized bored stones and were users of these modified digging sticks.

Digging stick image
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16672/16672-h/images/p089.png

From The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to His Death, Volume I (of 2), 1866-1868, by David Livingstone
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16672/16672-h/16672-h.htm


Dang dude, nice work!!!

It's not that big. Here's a photo of it next to a tape measure.

Chip
February 28, 2006, 16:45
Hey Id, thats amazing, I also picked up some petrafied wood in Africa, and a film can of red sand from the Kalahari desert. :wink:

Story
March 01, 2006, 11:12
Originally posted by idsubgun


Dang dude, nice work!!!

It's not that big. Here's a photo of it next to a tape measure.

No problem, hombre. It's what I *do*.

The stone looked bigger. I'd say it's one of those 'spear weights', for added penetration capability.

Bug Tussell
March 01, 2006, 12:07
Originally posted by Story


No problem, hombre. It's what I *do*.

The stone looked bigger. I'd say it's one of those 'spear weights', for added penetration capability.

The experience level on the files is simply amazing... post darn near any question and there is somebody who has done it and is willing to share their expertise...
Thanks for the input Story.

0302
March 01, 2006, 21:05
i am in gallup, or in navajo nun-zhoe-zha. i was there in about 1998. i guess you have to walk a ways to see the large quantites of petrified wood, but i didn't see much where the popular tourist stops are. i find the meteor crater much more interesting.

i like the el-fake-o dinosaurs along I40. the kids get a kick out of them, i work on the navajo rez and go through holbrook all the time on the way to tuba city and thereabouts.

Eclipse
March 03, 2006, 07:43
Back in the late 1800's to the 1930's it was common to harvest petrified wood

In Sioux Falls, Drake Polishing Works opened in 1883, the company polished stone for monuments and was most famous for its work with petrified wood. Among other things, it polished petrified wood for Tiffany and had creations in the 1893 Colombian Exposition in Chicago and in the 1904 World's Fair in St. Louis


If you make a road trip through eastern SD, check out the Petrified Wood Park in Lemmon, South Dakota
http://www.roadsideamerica.com/attract/SDLEMpetrified.html

festus
March 03, 2006, 08:01
It is a violation of the Antiquities act to collect or remove anything from federal lands. This includes metal detecting, rock hunting, fossil hunting, gathering plants, arrowhead hunting, grave robbing, or whatever else the gov. considers culturally valuable. They will nail the offenders with huge fines and prison terms as well. Now, if you are a federal employee, like a forest ranger, you can amass a sizable collection without drawing suspicion if you keep a low profile.
They are really serious about this stuff, and will prosecute the ignorant as well as the informed.

Bug Tussell
March 03, 2006, 08:53
Originally posted by festus
It is a violation of the Antiquities act to collect or remove anything from federal lands. This includes metal detecting, rock hunting, fossil hunting, gathering plants, arrowhead hunting, grave robbing, or whatever else the gov. considers culturally valuable. They will nail the offenders with huge fines and prison terms as well. Now, if you are a federal employee, like a forest ranger, you can amass a sizable collection without drawing suspicion if you keep a low profile.
They are really serious about this stuff, and will prosecute the ignorant as well as the informed.

I'll agree with you on the antiquities which would be the arrowheads, pot shards, etc... But as for rock hunting here is what I know from calling and talking to the various agencies. Forest Service doesn't have rules on rock collecting - it is the district ranger's call - some allow the "handfull" rule and some don't, some require that you get a mineral permit - $10. So if you're on FS land then call the district office to find out. BLM does have a rule in place (along with commercial activities they also recognize folks like me that want to collect rocks) - 25# plus one piece at a time with a 250 pound limit per year. Your "one piece" can range up to 200 # BTW.
Also, check with those same administering offices for plant gathering, metal detecting, etc... They will let you know what the requirements are. As for grave robbing (?) I don't think that they will give you a permit.... but you could always ask if that is important to you. :D

Bug Tussell
March 03, 2006, 08:58
Hey Idsubgun - how did those pieces of PW clean up?
Those pieces that I posted pictures of originally are in their found state - no cleaning, no polishing or anything. These were polished naturally through tumbling down river.
I was told that these pieces that we are collecting along the Rio Puerco migrated down from north of Santa Fe - total distance over 100 miles. Pretty nice to get your pieces already polished but you don't find much in the way of big pieces.

idsubgun
March 03, 2006, 09:41
festus,
Mine came from Africa. I doubt those gun wielding dudes at the roadblocks in Namibia even know where Idaho is, yet alone come over to get them back. :)
BTW, I had a U.S. Custom agent handle all this stuff when I came back stateside at the Atlanta airport.


Originally posted by Bug Tussell
Hey Idsubgun - how did those pieces of PW clean up?
I soaked them for a few days and took an old toothbrush and scrubbed the dog snot out of them but they look the same.
I thought about asking this dude at work that's into rocks about getting a couple of them sawn in two and polished.

Windustsearch
March 03, 2006, 10:21
Collection of Pwood on Fed land depends on the land and the agency involved. There is legal take on some fed lands here in WA. There is buttloads of the stuff all over the place in central WA (especially within 20 miles of the ginko petrified forest). Additionally, there are lots of private land owners who will have no problem with people searching for the stuff on their land if asked first.

Collection of artifacts is illegal on Fed land, period. It falls under the 1979 NAGPRA laws. Additionally some states protect artifacts from collection anywhere. Most states allow at least surface collection on private lands.

Story
March 03, 2006, 10:22
I didn't know that Tiffany used polished petrified wood, so I went poking around and found this peripheral tidbit:

One notable find of a gem-grade diamond, called the Searcy diamond, is reported from White County in 1926. A young girl picked up a pretty stone while working in a cotton field. It was later identified as a 27.21-carat gem-quality diamond. In 1946, the finder, Mrs. Pellie Howell, sold this uncut stone to Tiffany & Company of New York for $8,500. Still in Tiffany's possession, it is of a fine cape (pale yellow) color, has not yet been cut, and is the third largest diamond so far discovered in the United States. Some believe that this single stone was originally discovered by a Native American at or near the Prairie Creek pipe and dropped near Searcy where it was later found. There are no geologic or geophysical indications of diamond-bearing pipes in northeast Arkansas.

Interesting that the Indonesians offer furniture made of petrified wood.
http://www.chandicraft.com/stone/Petrified-Wood.htm

Story
November 30, 2006, 15:13
Just for you, Bug

Startling Discovery: The First Human Ritual
By Robert Roy Britt
LiveScience Managing Editor
posted: 30 November 2006
09:45 am ET
http://www.livescience.com/history/061130_oldest_ritual.html

More significant, when Coulson and her colleagues dug a test pit near they stone figure, they found spearheads made of stone that had to have been brought to the cave from hundreds of miles away [image]. The spearheads were burned in what only could be described as some sort of ritual, the scientists conclude.

"Stone age people took these colorful spearheads, brought them to the cave, and finished carving them there," Coulson said today. "Only the red spearheads were burned. It was a ritual destruction of artifacts. There was no sign of normal habitation. No ordinary tools were found at the site."

The discovery was made in a remote region of Botswana called Tsodilo Hills, the only uplifted area for miles around. It is known to modern Sanpeople as the "Mountains of the Gods" and the "Rock that Whispers." Their legend has it that mankind descended from the python, and the ancient, arid streambeds around the hills are said to have been created by the python as it circled the hills in its ceaseless search for water.