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Jon Frum
January 02, 2006, 20:39
I reqested a clam rake for Christmas this year. I was suprised to find some big Quahogs on the Georgia coast this last summer. Any of you guys clam? Quahog (http://seagrant.gso.uri.edu/factsheets/fsquahog.html) , Georgia DNR site (http://crd.dnr.state.ga.us/content/displaycontent.asp?txtDocument=343), Ribb clam rakes (http://www.ribbrakes.com/index.htm)

Windustsearch
January 02, 2006, 21:13
Yeah, once in awhile. Usually limit out so fast on Manilla and native littlenecks (40) it kind of takes the fun out of it. The area I go to is basically more clam than rock and sand.

I am guessing a quahog is similar to what we west coasters call a butter clam?

K. Funk
January 02, 2006, 21:27
Did quite a bit of clamming in the back bays of Delaware; Rehoboth Bay, Indian River. It got too much like work. Much easier to call ahead and have em steamed and ready for ya.

krf

Jon Frum
January 02, 2006, 21:40
Originally posted by Windustsearch
Yeah, once in awhile. Usually limit out so fast on Manilla and native littlenecks (40) it kind of takes the fun out of it. The area I go to is basically more clam than rock and sand.

I am guessing a quahog is similar to what we west coasters call a butter clam?


A Quahog I guess is more of a chowder clam-they are tough.

Windustsearch
January 02, 2006, 21:51
We have a couple of types that get chopped up and used for chowder. Butter, horse, and geoducks. The butter and horse clams are really common, and are mostly what you find. Little-necks usually get steamed and eaten whole. We also have good mussel hunting as well as oyster.

The real challenge is apparantly for razor clams. I have never done it. They haul through the sand like you wouldn't believe. The season is usually only open for a few days out of the year. At that time, the coastal beaches get nearly completely over-run with clam diggers.

I find clamming or mussel picking very enjoyable, especially when you get the whole beach to yourself.

Jon Frum
January 02, 2006, 22:23
Hogs

jerrymrc
January 02, 2006, 22:41
Spent many a day digging up Razor Clams on the oregon coast. Fast little buggers.:eek:

owlcreekok
January 03, 2006, 06:34
Years back, I would go set up a couple of smaller rods on the New River Inlet. Crank in the odd Spot, Croaker, Flounder. While awaiting a bite, I would wade around and feel the Clams with my bare feet. Reach down and grapple a few out. Also had a crab pot out at times. Made for a nice catch to go in and cook.

gunplumber
January 03, 2006, 10:36
Spent all day every summer when I was younger on Cape Cod Clamming and fishing.

Didn't have any fancy rake - had to harvest quohogs the old fasioned way - feeling with my toes.

"Planted" all the undersize ones at the boat mooring hoping they'd grow by the next year.

Now for soft shells and razor clams, I'd wait for low tide and rill rocks across the mud flats. The clams would squirt water in the air to "frighten" me away (or for whatever reason they do it. And I'd know where to dig. Lot of oysters in channel.

Most went into the pot (although in those days you could eat the Quohogs raw without keeling over dead from toxins) and the others were bait for scup (porgie), tautaug, dogfish, and the occasional baby bluefin tuna.

owlcreekok
January 03, 2006, 11:39
Tautog (spelling ?) Now THERE's a species I had forgotton all about. Way back when, there was an old tank (as in military fighting vehicle) semi submerged at the end of an island around Camp Lejeune's miles of beach / estuary. Just off the tank's end was about 15 -20 ft of water at low tide. I used to catch Tautog in that hole on occasion. One year after a bad storm blew for days, I went back to fish my spot. Tank was gone. I waited around for low tide, still no tank. No Tautog either ! :sad:

Powderfinger
January 08, 2006, 13:06
You can learn something every day on the Files!

I had no idea there is an Atlantic coast variety of "razor" clam, 2 varieties in fact.
I tent camped for the first time when I was 6 weeks old (don't remember:D)
at Camp Cleveland near North Cove,WA , the first of 2 or 3 trips each summer there. The camp catered to diggers and had a cleaning shed with a row of sinks down each side. The women would line up with there buckets and file through. The men drank beer at that point. Fried or in chowder, clam heaven. Now the state has the digs strangled with miniscule limits, "red tide" closures, night time only digs and short seasons. Right now I'm jonesin' for some Olympia oysters. They are about 1"-1 1/2 " diameter. I got a line on some yesterday from a guy at work who moonlights as a chef on his days off. Perfect stew size.



The Pacific Razor clam (Siliqua patula) is a bivalve mollusk with an elongated oblong narrow shell which ranges from 3 to 6.25 inches in length. They can be found along the Pacific West Coast from Eastern Aleutian Islands, Alaska, to Pismo Beach, California. The American East Coast example of a Razor Clam is The Atlantic Razor Clam (Siliqua costata). This species resembles its Pacific counterpart, but does not grow as large. Another eastern species ensis directus (sometimes referred to as a "Razor Clam," but better known as the "Atlantic Jackknife Clam") is found from Cape Cod to Florida and can reach ten inches in length.

Plagarized from Wikipedia.