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ER
October 12, 2005, 22:55
Aside from the SHTF threads elswhere on this "rapidly filling with assweb members" site, what do y`all carry in yer "pleasure" daypacks?

Me, I hike some, and more so during the pre-hunting season while scouting. I get to look for game and see the country from many spots I haven`t been before.

I`ve got a cheapie Mossy-Oak pack from wally-world about 3 years old that has 2 main compartments and one small mesh one on the outside. In it I carry:

1. TP.....never leave home without it.
2. A SHARP Old-Timer folding lockblade with 2 blades(1 has a guthook)
3. 2-AA cell MagLite w/8ft of para-cord and GI steel carabiner
4. Magellan GPS(after last weekend, in elevations above the ceiling level(big time fog) with leaves still on the trees, this thing may stay home till the winter season opens.....damn near useless)
5. GI lensatic compass
6. 20rds for the Super Blackhawk on my side
7. 20ft para cord coil
8. Topo map of the area
9. Beanie-Weanies, 2 cans
10. Lance crackers, 2 packs
11. Spoon
12. 2 bottles water
13. GI heavy weight poncho
14. 1 roll surveyor`s tape
15. small, compact 8x binoc`s
16. OD green bandana
17. Wind/water proof matches
18. Tylenol
19. Band-aids and GI first aid compress

For y`all wondering why all the GI stuff, it`s leftover`s from my time in service. I don`t have to buy new, and I`m familiar with it.

Any more suggestions?

Temp
October 13, 2005, 03:09
Dang,... that's a lotta stuff for a day trip.

I've spent many days hunting in the mountains with nothing more than a rifle, 20 rounds of ammo, a canteen fulla water, a skinning knife, a lighter, and a pack of cigarettes.

cycle_rcr
October 13, 2005, 06:44
I hate ticks and mosquitos. I always have bug stay away stuff. Also, a folding pruning saw, it gets used a lot.

Top maps are excellent for finding your way in unfamiliar areas.

WiFAL
October 13, 2005, 07:46
Range Finder
Hydrogen Peroxide and Neosporin - In case I cut myself cleaning an animal
Gutting Gloves
Lens Wipes and or Q-Tips

Randall
October 13, 2005, 11:04
Can opener? More waterproof matches Water purification tablets, Good topo map of the area you plan to be in, and a note at home telling exactly where you'll be...They'll want to know where to find the body. :eek: :biggrin:
Randy

'TUDE
October 13, 2005, 18:05
I'll describe what is in the pack I just took off a few minutes ago. Mind you, I wear this pack as I did earlier in scouting for sign at my hunting spot, not an all day pack.

Small 2 compartment "school type" pack.
bottle of water
map
lighter
cigs
compass (never need it but....)
cell
mini-maglite
orange flaging tape
4 bearclaw steps(screw in steps to climb trees)
Leatherman

Now, when I plan on a half-day plus, all I add is
another bottle of water
MRE
dete wipes
para cord
small first aid kit

When I'm hunting, no food, no dete, no nothing with odor goes out with me.

Windustsearch
October 13, 2005, 19:09
I bring smokes, water, and my snake hook. Also, a digital point and shoot and a notebook and pencil. That's about all I carry on day hikes.

ER
October 13, 2005, 21:20
Dang,... that's a lotta stuff for a day trip.

Prolly so, but usually pack too much for an overnighter too :uhoh: . Early season is a Remington M34 .22 rifle instead of the Super on state game lands due to regulations, or sometimes I carry a .22Hornet/.410 Springfield M6 Scout instead. The compass is there because the GPS is so unreliable IMHO. I`m just getting used to the GPS after so many years with a compass. It`s hard to part with an old friend.

Sometimes I dump the poncho, especially in the fall when the pop-up t`storms are not likely. I guess I might need a lighter and some heat tabs out of my overnight pack in case I get caught out longer than I want to be and wanna heat up my beanie-weenies!

Any more?

FTW2012
October 13, 2005, 23:42
how about a couple of bricks, a boat anchor,
a portable bridge or an engine block?
a crucifix / wooden stake / wolf bane / a mirror

Simple is best, simple and light is even better,

Key word (DAY TRIP) usually 15 miles or less?
20-25 if you are in really, really good shape?

a compass & the knowledge to use it,
I was not joking about the mirror or something reflective, could come in handy

1 MRE or a few granola bars are plenty,
you will not starve to death in a day (really a only few hours)
chances are you can go a few days without food?

small first aid / ace bandage/ snake bite kit / insect repellant
probably not bad things to have

magnesium fire statrer, I've had the same one for 5 years, never used it
plain old Zippo has never done me wrong

a sharp knife

a pistol, preferably a .357 with some extra rounds
I usually have 5 in the revolver & another 10 or 12 in the bullet loops
its a hike not a shootout. besides, how many snakes and bears are going to attack you in one day anyway?

a litre wine skin filled with water / water purification tablets

a poncho or thermofoil blanket in questionable weather, no need in summer

all together less than 10 LBS, most of the weight is the pistol & water

if you are going to scout game or want to spend the night bring a nylon shelter hammock along, they only weigh 2-3 LBS, keep you off the ground & covered

If a few people are going, split this stuff between you and you might not even need packs! Just use the side utility pockets on your BDU's

Happy hiking!

Randall
October 14, 2005, 16:55
The compass is there because the GPS is so unreliable IMHO. I`m just getting used to the GPS after so many years with a compass. It`s hard to part with an old friend. Never part with your compass. Your GPS is a tool that runs off batteries, and may or may not work depending on weather, trees, terrain, etc...It's an electronic gadget that may or may not survive a soak in a stream. Always good to have the compass and a good (preferably laminated) topo map. They weigh next to nothing and may just save your life.
Just my .02.
Randy

masman
October 16, 2005, 08:41
i have a small pack that i take hunting.i usually put in 5-10 miles while hunting.if i was doing a overnighter then i would take more.
[list=1]
poncho
waterproof matches
space blanket
water
sandwich
candy
rope
compass(i have a pin on one on my jacket but have a backup in my pack
orange flaging tape
tp
[/list=1]

Windustsearch
October 16, 2005, 11:09
It's sammich, not sandwhich.

FortunateSon
October 16, 2005, 12:22
My Big Agnes insulated air core mattress folds up suprisingly small and it's extremely light. For scouting, it may come in under "luxury" items, but to me it makes a huge difference. If you think you may be out all night, it can be rolled up inside a gore tex bivy ( I use the GI woodland bivy covers) and makes a ltwt shelter that can keep you alive.

Farmer from Hell
October 17, 2005, 10:12
What no sardines?

A couple years ago they had an article in Backpacker magazine on survival. Not the tin foil hat stuff.

Any way they made the persuasive argument that anytime you’re out and about in the woods you should have some rudimentary survival equipment. The usual small stuff, matches, signal mirror, small flashlight etc.

The interesting thing I got from the article was that they proposed to pack this stuff in a fanny pack that you could wear while wearing a backpack. They opined that you could take a fall down a slope or somehow get separated from you pack with all your goodies (i.e. day hike from campsite). This way, wearing the fanny pack, you’d still have stuff to stay alive until help arrives. Made complete sense to me. I put one together soon after reading the article.

Having a little kit like that would be a lifesaver in a bad spot.

FTW2012
October 17, 2005, 11:14
This is just a thought, it is not directed at anyone in particular,
I just wnat to ensure everyone's saftey in the wilderness,
but, if you do not feel you can wander 5 miles from camp without
having a Mc Donalds, a Walmart or a heated bathroom
within 100 yards from you,
Maybe you should not go into the woods at all.
Its not safe. Fear of the unknown is even less safe.

"There are horrible monsters out there that will eat you alive
and steal your soul." "Steer clear of the moores"
(American Warewolf in London)

zack taylor
October 18, 2005, 00:17
FTW2012

Thanks for the useless dribble that you just 'contributed' to this fine thread.:rolleyes:

calvinike
October 18, 2005, 12:01
Widustsearch,

I always thought it was "sangwidge"

calavera
October 18, 2005, 14:28
Nobody carries sunscreen? Y'all must look like hot dog wieners that have been on the grill too long. :D

Windustsearch
October 18, 2005, 14:35
No, I don't carry sun screen or bug spray, its easier to apply it and leave it in the car than to pack it up a hill.

crcksht
October 18, 2005, 15:10
I carry a minimum of stuff for dayhikes.

Tanto knife, fixed 4" blade
Bandages and bandaids
Lighter
Extra mags for pistol
Trail mix or other snacks
Some TP
Topo map if the area's new to me

Depending on the weather I might add a poncho or jacket. In the winter I add an extra pair of socks and some gloves. I rarely carry a compass.

Edited to add:

I omitted water from pack contents above because I usually carry water over the shoulder in a GI 2 quart collapsible canteen.

Windustsearch
October 18, 2005, 17:11
Depending on the weather I might add a poncho or jacket. In the winter I add an extra pair of socks and some gloves. I rarely carry a compass.

Same here. The weather and area make a big difference in what I pack. I have never carried a compass except when working where it is needed to stay on straight transects and other things. I have always instinctively walked right back to the car give or take a few hundred yards. Its automatic.

FTW2012
October 18, 2005, 22:48
Originally posted by zack taylor
FTW2012

Thanks for the useless dribble that you just 'contributed' to this fine thread.:rolleyes:

You are the type of guy who would need a pillow and a picture of his momma to wander 5 feet from camp.
Its OK, just bring her with you, you may need your bottom wiped when that bear attacks.

zack taylor
October 18, 2005, 23:42
Dream on, little boy.

W.E.G.
October 18, 2005, 23:51
I wish I were a moderator in this forum. I'd sure be doin' some shittin' and splittin'.

FTW, your first outburst was truly funny. I really did laugh out loud. But, its getting ugly now. What say everybody who's fussin' give it a rest.

FTW2012
October 19, 2005, 01:17
Originally posted by gary.jeter
I wish I were a moderator in this forum. I'd sure be doin' some shittin' and splittin'.

FTW, your first outburst was truly funny. I really did laugh out loud. But, its getting ugly now. What say everybody who's fussin' give it a rest.

Zack can't help himself, its that whole terets thing.
Just feel sorry for him. He dosen't know what he is saying half the time anyway
He usually gets most of his direction from Vince. Nuff said?

Windustsearch
October 19, 2005, 02:29
FWT, I can tell by what you posted that you pack, that you don't know jack.

For starters, just what are you going to do with a snakebite kit?

FTW2012
October 19, 2005, 10:58
Originally posted by Windustsearch
FWT, I can tell by what you posted that you pack, that you don't know jack.

For starters, just what are you going to do with a snakebite kit?

We have lots of poisonious snakes here in Idaho,
Have you ever been bit in the back of the leg by 2' a rattler?

As far as what I know. You don't know me.
There is the desert to the South of me and mountains to the North.
I spend / spent a lot of time in both terrains.
There is something to hunt all year long here. I am an avid hunter.
Most of the state is unpopulated. Out of just over a million people,
half live around Boise, the rest are scattered throughout.
If you were to take the state of ID and flatten it out it would take up as much area as TX. Knowing your way around is an important skill here.

Where do you live? How much time do you spend outside?
I'm sure you imaging you are a Rambo or something.
But, eating lunch in the park on the 1/2 hour allowed by your boss
doesn't count as wilderness experience.
As you sit there on a bench chewing your egg salad,
imagining squirrels are bears, I'm out hunting bears.

crcksht
October 19, 2005, 11:14
Originally posted by Windustsearch


Same here. The weather and area make a big difference in what I pack. I have never carried a compass except when working where it is needed to stay on straight transects and other things. I have always instinctively walked right back to the car give or take a few hundred yards. Its automatic.

Good points. I wasn't trying to discourage people from using a compass though, I just rarely find them necessary while backpacking or hiking in areas such as the GSMNP. Most of the trails are well brazed and easy to follow. If I'm cutting through country off of trails in areas of very thick vegetation, a topo map and compass can be handy. Although with so many streams and rivers where I hike, someone who finds themselves lost off-trail can simply follow one downstream until they either cross a path, a road or the stream spills into a lake.

FTW2012,

I've never been snake bit because I don't step on snakes. Generally if you don't try to hurt the snake it wont strike. I would guess we have more snakes per square mile in eastern TN than in your area and I've never had a problem with snakes, whether poisonsous Copperheads or Timber Rattlers both of which we have in abundance. In our part of the country with its thick vegetation, you rarely see the snake until you are within a step of standing on it.

Mtn
October 19, 2005, 15:40
To me the main thing is to have what you might need. I am one of the people that gets yanked out of a sound sleep to go look for folks that just went on a day hike. Many times it is someone that hikes alot and has outdoor experience but has gotten hurt.

That tad extra food and other comfort provisions they brought along is what at times ahs been the differnce between being sent to the ER or the morgue.

B Wood
October 19, 2005, 21:31
suprised no one has mentioned zip loc bags or garbage bags. Work great for keeping lots of things dry, water storage, shelter, etc.

There are some items in all my packs that take up little space / weight that can make life much more comfy if you are stuck. I also have about 20' of duct tape....unrolled....and then stored flat wrapped around just like on the roll...except the roll is not there. also carry a small metal cup, tea bags, single serving coffee packet, couple sugar packets....can make the diff if you need to warm up quick....pocket stove is wonderful too...the little esbit stoves work great.

ER
October 19, 2005, 22:56
suprised no one has mentioned zip loc bags or garbage bags. Work great for keeping lots of things dry, water storage, shelter, etc.

Actually, I left them out by mistake. The band-aids and Tylenol are in one, as are my hunting license and wallet(I never leave my wallet with DL/CCW permit/etc in my jeep), plus one or 2 extra. I`ve never used them for wter storage, but you bring up a good point in a "have to" situation.

As for why I carry a lot of stuff I prolly won`t ever need in my day/hunting pack....a short story:
I`ve hunted and hiked Linville Gorge Wilderness area most all of my life, and never carried anything other than a rifle or pistol and the clothes on my back, until Thanksgiving day 1982. I was on the east side of the eastern ridge of the gorge chasing a deer I had seen cross a creek. Thru numerous laurel thickets, and up/down many ridges I went. After about an hour of this, I decided it was time to get back towards camp(this was about noon).
I emerged from the woods 1 mile from camp on an old logging road I knew at dark(`bout 6pm). How I got there is beyond me. I had always been in areas where I could usually get on high ground and see the mountain tops I knew and get my bearings as to where I needed to go. On the east slope of Shortoff mtn, it`s too damn thick to see anything much. I couldn`t get my bearings, and was dead reckoning for almost 6 hrs in an area I though of as my "back yard".

Now, wherever I go, a compass and topo map goes, along with some stuff to help make me comfortable should I have to spend a night I hadn`t really planned for due to injury, etc, or if I only plan to go out for an hour or two but actually stay out all day. It`s a long time from breakfast till supper, and them beanie-weanies taste damn good about 3PM!!!!

FTW2012
October 19, 2005, 23:41
Our rattlers get up to five feet max,
http://www.idahogeocachers.org/rattlesnakes.htm

Babies are actually more dangerous than adults.
I have never been bitten but, nation wide about 8,000 people are bitten by poisonous snakes each year. Only 10 - 15 of them die.
Last year more people died from bee stings or lightning strikes!

I've been to Tennessee, you do have some nasty ones there!

Windustsearch
October 20, 2005, 09:48
FTW, you came on in here acting like you were the only one who knows what they are doing, guess what, you are wrong. There are lots of avid outdoor types here. For you just to assume we are all just weekend warriors is stupid.

For starters, not only do I work outside a great deal of the time, I go out on my off-time. Secondly, I have been studying rattlesnakes for over 25 years. I have captured hundreds, if not thousands. I have read the journal articles and the books. I have kept them in captivity for years. I am sure I am qualified to say: you will never find one that measures 5 feet in Idaho, the young ones are NOT more dangerous, and snake bite kits do not work, they just do more damage.

Give it some thought next time you assume we are a bunch of candy-asses.

FTW2012
October 20, 2005, 12:09
Windustsearch, you are the one making undue assunptions.
Your show of offence must mean I hit a nerve with you.
Enjoy your egg salad son!

FTW2012
October 20, 2005, 12:10
assumptions

FTW2012
October 20, 2005, 12:29
The Western rattlesnake is common in much of eastern Washington.
Western rattlesnakes measure 18 inches to 4 feet at maturity in Washington.

Although many people talk of seeing “timber rattlers,” “diamondbacks,” and “sidewinders,” none of these occur in Washington.
The gopher snake, also known as the bull snake, is often mistaken for a rattlesnake.

Windustsearch, are you jelous that my snake is bigger than yours?

Windustsearch
October 20, 2005, 19:57
FTW, the subspecies that lives in WA and in alot of Idaho is the Northern Pacific Rattlesnake, it is the largest of the 9 western rattlesnake subspecies. There are 3 subspecies in Idaho, the Prairie, Great Basin, and Nothern Pacific. All are Western rattlesnakes. Keep trying.

You are not going to find out much about them on the internet, you'll have to read.

FTW2012
October 20, 2005, 21:36
I could really care less:rolleyes:

Windustsearch
October 21, 2005, 12:13
Well, its a good thing we all need to stay at McDonalds and out of the woods, and that you carry around your snakebite kit.

Since I don't know what I am doing:rolleyes:

Friend
October 21, 2005, 12:48
Daypack;

food and water

Everything else I need for the area I am in and what I am doing is kept on me for the "day".

Friend

Farmer from Hell
October 21, 2005, 13:38
Originally posted by B Wood
suprised no one has mentioned zip loc bags or garbage bags. Work great for keeping lots of things dry, water storage, shelter, etc.

He He when I first put together my other post I tried to reel off the contents of my fanny pack by memory (in which I have two contractor grade hefty bags) but couldnt.

If you take two and slit open the bottom of one and then over lap the other and duct tape them together you can sting them between two trees with para chord they make a decent tube tent.

Here's the link (http://search.rodale.com/search97cgi/s97_cgi?action=View&VdkVgwKey=http%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Ebackpacker%2Ecom%2Far ticle%2F1%2C2646%2C954%2C00%2Ehtml%3F&DocOffset=1&DocsFound=37&QueryZip=survival&Collection=backpacker&ViewTemplate=docview%2Ehts&SearchUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fsearch%2Erodale%2Ecom%2Fsea rch97cgi%2Fs97%5Fcgi%3Faction%3DSearch%26QueryZip% 3Dsurvival%26ResultTemplate%3DBPResults%252Ehts%26 QueryText%3Dsurvival%26Collection%3Dbackpacker%26V iewTemplate%3Ddocview%252Ehts%26ResultStart%3D1%26 ResultCount%3D10&) to the prevuiously mentioned article. On the right hand of the page is a link to the survival kit contents.

FfH

0302
November 12, 2005, 00:43
this is an excellent list of goodies for a day hike, i live in nw new mexico, mountains and desert and very little water, large temp changes, as much as 50 degrees, and i try to pack in case i have to spend the night out due to injury, lost , whatever reason. i would add a poncho liner or survival blanket, water proofed map, whistle, plastic drink hose, pencil and note paper, compressed fuel tablet, immodium (for diahrea), iodine tablets for water purification, two canteens, canteen cup, cell phone (sometimes). i usually wear a lbe with buttpack which is good for summer, spring, and part of fall, and more gear is needed for winter, but i pack for the worst case scenario, staying overnight or maybe 2 or 3 nights in the cold and make sure i tell someone reliable where i am going and when i am supposed to return.

1. TP.....never leave home without it.
2. A SHARP Old-Timer folding lockblade with 2 blades(1 has a guthook)
3. 2-AA cell MagLite w/8ft of para-cord and GI steel carabiner
4. Magellan GPS(after last weekend, in elevations above the ceiling level(big time fog) with leaves still on the trees, this thing may stay home till the winter season opens.....damn near useless)
5. GI lensatic compass
6. 20rds for the Super Blackhawk on my side
7. 20ft para cord coil
8. Topo map of the area
9. Beanie-Weanies, 2 cans
10. Lance crackers, 2 packs
11. Spoon
12. 2 bottles water
13. GI heavy weight poncho
14. 1 roll surveyor`s tape
15. small, compact 8x binoc`s
16. OD green bandana
17. Wind/water proof matches
18. Tylenol
19. Band-aids and GI first aid compress

the gman
November 12, 2005, 20:14
0302, where you bin hidin'? Being down here to the S of ABQ, I guess we ain't never met, would sure like to tho', either at one of the gunshows or maybe the big meeting we're tryin' to put together at Raton next spring, be good to meet another NM FAL'er.:beer:

Anyways, back to the thread.... I suprised so many of y'all carry canteens. I am a firm convert to the hydration pack. You can buy some real nifty combo day sack/Hydration carriers these days & I find it a LOT more comfortable than carrying a canteen or thermos.

I've humped a lot of gear a long ways in the past (altho' I was a lot fitter then) & I try to minimise, difficult sometimes as I'm of the 'better to have it & not need it rather than need it & not have it' attitude.

Anyways, I always carry the TP, a space blanket, small first aid kit, couple of energy bars, knife is on the belt, compass, topo map, GPS & the bladder either full or most ways full of water or Gatorade. Natch the smokes & my lighter with a back up of a book of matches. Have my digital camera & if scouting, my combo bino/rangefinder around the neck on the 'Man's bra'.

Other stuff depends how far I am from the truck, what the weather is like, yadda, yadda. Lotsa good ideas here, thanks for the thread!:beer: :smile:

splattermatic
November 12, 2005, 20:21
just remember these words..

"the packs too heavy, lose more weight out of it"

always, always, buy a quality item that is the lightest in weight possible, you'll be surprised how much a few ounces weigh in short order....


(just ask the gman) :biggrin:

Treborer
November 12, 2005, 21:58
Add a couple of capules of "Benedryl" , if any thing stings ya, take one.

An absolute real deal worthwhile item.

:wink:

jcbrown
November 13, 2005, 00:29
A tanto knife.
Swiss pocket knife.
GPS and a topo map. 1 set of spare batteries.
Cell Phone.
Small first aid kit. Band aids, antibiotic, guaze, tylenol and benedryl.
Space blanket.
Swiss rain poncho.
Camelback. If going really out there, a purification pump.
A couple granola bars.
Toilet papar.
Gloves. I take the rubber nomex gloves. Warm and practical.
A utility tube - magnesium firestarter, compass, matches, whistle.
Binocs.
.45 with 2 spare mags.

This sounds like a lot of gear, but it fits in the back pack with tons of room to spare. Weather has an impact, as well as location.

0302
November 15, 2005, 20:28
i've been layin low, have small kiddies that take up about 110% of my spare time. there are plenty of folks who die in the boonies around here, usually cold related. high today was 50 low tonight will be 15. gallup is almost in arizona, plenty of shooters aroung here but i am yet to see another faler. so whats up with the raton deal?

Bug Tussell
November 18, 2005, 06:49
TP
Small binocs
keychain compass/thermometer
MRE
beef jerky - mine is seasoned with dried red chile
lightweight jacket - neatly folded in 1gal plastic storage bag
water in bottles
yellow cased suction snake bite kit - yeah, yeah I know - common wisdom says not to suck the poison out however, a friend got stung by a bee - he used the kit to suck out the stinger - pain went away.
.45 auto
pair of FRS radios
GPS
cell phone
hat

Opie
November 18, 2005, 19:00
What I have packed in the past is somewhat similar, but there are a couple of things that weren't mentioned so I'll list what I normally pack for the day.

1 roll of TP/ 1 box baby wipes (sometimes it's nice ta feel "Baby-fresh") :biggrin:

3 pair of socks in ziplock baggie

1 pair Blue Jeans in ziplock baggie

1 shirt/sweater in ziplock baggie

25 ft of 550 cord

1 pair of boots

small first-aid kit

40 rounds for rifle I'm packing

50 rounds .45 ACP (1 box)

USGI Cleaning kit

2 MRE's

Poncho with liner.

Zippo lighter with extra fluid/flints

pocketknife

compass/ map


That usually covers what I need, and whatever situations that I may run into.

wildwilly
November 23, 2005, 12:56
The one thing several people mentioned is a must for me is a flashlight of some dependable type. Perhaps two. All the other ideas are good but the water and pack get heavy. Must be my age cannot see at night as good as I used to.
Then there is snow, fog, and dark timber on the northside of the hill. Never been lost but have temporarily lost argument with compass. HA HA.

Auslander
December 08, 2005, 16:22
1. TP.....never leave home without it.
2. A SHARP Old-Timer folding lock blade with 2 blades(1 has a guthook)
3. 2-AA cell MagLite w/8ft of para-cord and GI steel carabiner
4. Magellan GPS(after last weekend, in elevations above the ceiling level(big time fog) with leaves still on the trees, this thing may stay home till the winter season opens.....damn near useless)
5. GI lensatic compass
6. 20rds for the Super Blackhawk on my side
7. 20ft para cord coil
8. Topo map of the area
9. Beanie-Weanies, 2 cans
10. Lance crackers, 2 packs
11. Spoon
12. 2 bottles water
13. GI heavy weight poncho
14. 1 roll surveyor`s tape
15. small, compact 8x binoc`s
16. OD green bandana
17. Wind/water proof matches
18. Tylenol
19. Band-aids and GI first aid compress

That’s all good to have. I was taught to have all my kit with me as a kid. No water will kill you quick in West Texas. You need to have a “band aid tin” kit in your pocket all the time if you’re not in sight of the house. Having a little extra in the bottom of the pack is good sense too. I’d get rid of the can food and buy some mountain house or alpineaire freeze dried and add an extra bottle water. Or I’d replace the canned goods with the fruit bars out of MRE’s.

I have in my pocket sitting at the computer, a tin with snare wire and a wire saw, a magnesium fire starter and pryo tinder (lint like stuff that burns hotter than hell) with a tiny little old timer pocket knife and a no lube condom to use as a water bag just in case. The tin fits in the 'other dent' in my backside. You know the one opposite the dent your wallet makes.

In Jeep is my man purse with my spare magazine for the Glock with similar items to the list above. I keep every thing in dry-lock bags (getting your gear soaked in a thunder storm makes it heavy and then stuff molds.) I have my radio and one day-night signal (orange smoke/red flare) in it too. I get cell phone reception on the hill tops and can reach the sheriffs office in Sanderson on my hand held from most of my place. I keep my coyote rifle in the jeep with one 20 rnd magazine of softpoints and one magazine of ball. I carry five gallons of water and five gallons of fuel too.

tigerjr
December 23, 2005, 00:05
Everything just depends on your level of knowledge and skill in the outdoors, some people don't need a thing, others enjoy a little luxury by simply carrying an emergency blanket and zippo, it just all depends on what you like to have and how much you know about the natural environment and how to use it's already present and abundant resources.

Wodan
January 08, 2006, 16:54
As a general rule I try to keep enough junk on me to last me through the night, just in case something I hadn't planned for messes up my day.

What that is depends on the season and where I'm hiking. Up in the Pacific Northwest I'll be hauling rain gear and a small blanket or poncho liner most of the year; in the Southwest I'll be carrying sunblock, lots of extra water, and a space blanket (portable shade during the day, blanket at night); in the Midwest and Plains: BUG SPRAY, lots of the stuff, enough to make the f%$&ing chiggers, mosquitoes, and ticks puke. And... well, I'd say what extra weather gear I pack depends on the season, but I've seen some freaky weather out there on the plains. Just because the calender says August doesn't mean that you're not going to be scraping ice off the windshield in the morning.

Aside from that, it's mostly just the normal content of my pockets, water, trail food (i.e. junk food), a flattened roll of TP in a ziplock, and a larger than normal first aid kit (EMT here, think BSI and ABCs, with some OTC meds for gastrointestinal complaints and allergic reaction due to stings or dermal contact with noxious weeds).

I do tend to keep some powdered sports drink mix packets on hand for electrolyte replacement. Most of them are full of sugar, so they serve dual-use as emergency glucose powder as well.

It seems like a good idea to carry a small bottle of those iodine or chlorine tabs for water purification, but I've never gotten around to carrying them though.

I will admit though that the "normal content of my pockets" is going to encompass more gear than a lot of the day packs mentioned here. :D

-Folding Buck knife
-Leatherman multi-tool
-Keys with LED light and magnesium firestarter on the keyring
-Flashlight
-Cell phone
-Zippo
-Compass
-Latex gloves and pocket CPR barrier
-Hand sanitizer (it's gelled alcohol, a great firestarter)
-Hard candy (Some folks carry chewing gum, I carry hard sugar ;) )
-Sunglasses


I also have one of those pocket first aid kits from Coleman that I beefed up a bit. It's a 4x4 cloth pouch with a zipper closure. It's usually in the car, or in a jacket pocket, but it comes with me on hikes or camping trips. It contains:
-Tweezers
-Eyedrops (sml. btl., look for free samples from your Ophthalmologist, they're about 1/4th the size of an OTC bottle)
-Steel mirror (it's hard to pick a splinter out of your eye, or close up a gash on your forehead, just by feel)
-Moleskin
-Q-tips
-4x4 gauze pad (x2)
-2X2 gauze pad
-Bandaids (from the blister sized things up to the kneepad)
-Alcohol prep pads (x3? I thought I had more..) (good tinder in a pinch too)
-Iodine prep pads (x2)
-Antiseptic towelettes (x4)
-Acetaminophen 500mg tabs. (analgesic; antipyretic) (Look for the foil packs that hold a dose or two)
-Naproxen Sodium 220mg tabs. (anti-inflammatory; analgesic)
-Aspirin 81mg tab. (DO NOT USE IN TRAUMA CASES! Mild anticoagulant; analgesic; antipyretic)
-Diphenhydramine Hydrochloride 25mg tabs. (antihistamine)
-Hydrocortisone 1% liquid, roll-on stick (topical anti-inflammatory)
-Bismuth subsalicylate 262mg tabs. (antidiarrheal; antacid)
-Triple-Antibiotic cream (guess what it's used for)
-Cyanoacrylate (personal use; do not use as wound closure fluid without a DAMNED good idea what you're doing. If you haven't been trained to suture properly you can end up doing more harm than good)

I'll haul along a more comprehensive kit in a belt-pouch when I'm in the sticks. I tend to drag along a mid-size oralpharyngeal airway, a nasal airway as well, a good number of 4X4s, an occlusive dressing, assorted Kerlix or Vet-bond (great bandage, love the stuff), a larger Red Cross pocket mask (pocket size my hairy backside....), 2-inch ACE bandage, 4-inch ACE, a bottle of saline eyewash (serves dual-use as wound irrigation fluid), Steri-Strips, a bottle of Actidose, some of my PPE (goggles; mask; gloves, preciousss glovesss...) and some junk I just can't remember without hauling the camping gear out of the closet and checking.

When in the outdoors in hunting season, I'd also seriously consider dragging along a better trauma kit. You never know what types of holes you may need to patch up.

I don't normally carry epi, but if I was camping or hunting with anyone who had a history of allergic reactions, I'd encourage them to get a prescription for a kit. I'd also drag along one myself in case they misplaced theirs.

sslocal
January 10, 2006, 15:02
I don't hike much anymore since I broke my heel but I do ride a mountain bike in the woods.
I normally carry a medium large camel back that holds 100 oz. of water. With all this water, you sweat like a pig on a bike going up hill, I carry the following:

First aid kit
Spyderco Endura
Lighter
Space blanket
Spare tube
Patch kit
Pump
Small tool kit for trail side repairs
Pencil wrapped with duct tape
Compass
Energy bars
Wind breaker

In winter months capaline jerseys are a must have for the down hill at the end of the ride.
As most of you know weather can change in the hills at a moments notice. For that reason a wind breaker is always carried, even in the summer. (yes I have used in in the summer)

tigerjr
January 12, 2006, 00:32
Camel Bricks are DEATH, don't ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, cary a Camel Back. They freeze into useless solid blocks of ice and you just have to throw them away. If it is warm enough all the time to keep them from freezing they are leaky at times and are very hard to completely fill. Likewise if you are even the least bit lazy it is quite a chore to clean thoroughly and will often result in mold and mildeau in some of the far off places even ones that looked like they got cleaned.

sslocal
January 12, 2006, 13:07
Originally posted by tigerjr
Camel Bricks are DEATH, don't ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, cary a Camel Back. They freeze into useless solid blocks of ice and you just have to throw them away. If it is warm enough all the time to keep them from freezing they are leaky at times and are very hard to completely fill. Likewise if you are even the least bit lazy it is quite a chore to clean thoroughly and will often result in mold and mildeau in some of the far off places even ones that looked like they got cleaned.

Since I live in the south PRK having my camelback freeze into a solid block of ice is not a concern.
I stand by my statements until I leave this god forsaken state and need to alter my equipment to suit a different enviroment.

jimmertoons
January 31, 2006, 00:05
Space blankets are handy, especially as a signal mirror. Since silver reflections are common in nature, (water, ice, etc.) carrying gold or copper color sheet is advised. The off-color reflection is very distinguishable from natural colors.

Texgunner
January 31, 2006, 11:21
If one is of, uh, say a certain age, one might consider a couple pair of reading eyeglasses. I know I'd be lost without them and it might just come in handy if one had "close-up" work to do. Just a thought...
Gary