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gman552
July 29, 2005, 17:37
A guy I know through work is getting together a group for a dove hunting lease (I'm in the Dallas/Ft. Worth area) and asked me if I was interested in joining the group.

I've never been hunting before, so what advice do you all have for a newbie?

Some questions:

- What is involved in leasing? Financially and otherwise, like grounds upkeep, etc.?

- What should I expect to pay for my part?

Any information would be very helpful.

Plain George
July 29, 2005, 21:07
I guessing as an end result, those doves (the ones you kill) will cost you about $50.00 each....

tn hp
July 31, 2005, 15:52
Issues to consider:

1. Does TX require you to attend a Hunter Safety Course? If so, you better sign up now, if its not to late.

2. Do you own a shotgun and have you ever shot skeet? If you own a shotgun, go to the nearest skeet/trap club and practice. If you don't own a shotgun, get your hunting companion's opinion, buy the best you can afford and learn to load, unloan, disassemble, clean and assemble it until you are competent in every aspect. Do not buy "cheap" shells, you get what you pay for when it comes to guns and ammo.

3. TX law may require that leases, even hunting leases, involving real estate be in writing. Is there a lawyer in your hunting group that can draw up or review a proposed lease?

4. Your cost will be pro rata and depend how many people are in your group.

5. Field preparation, planting, fuel, tractor time, etc. generally are included in the price and shared equally by all members of the lease.

6. Since hunting locations are scarce and public hunting fields can be very crowded and dangerous, I would highly recommend leasing.

7. What type of experience, both hunting and with hunting leases, does the "guy" at work have?

8. Make sure you know the members of the lease, trust their business and hunting sense. You are, after all, putting your personal and financial safety in their hands.

9. Most of all, have fun, be safe and welcome to a wonderful sport that will bring you many years of enjoyment, companionship and new, best friends!

tn hp

"Let he who hath no FN FAL, sell his cloak and buy one."
:fal:

p.s.
$50 a dove is cheaper that $200 per hour for thearpy.

Deltaten
July 31, 2005, 17:06
Swing fast, lotsa lead, and bring plenty of ammo! ;)
THose beasties aren't called "gray rockets" fer nuttin'

Enjoy,
Paul

tigerfans2
July 31, 2005, 18:48
Originally posted by Plain George
I guessing as an end result, those doves (the ones you kill) will cost you about $50.00 each....


uhhmmmmmm........ yeah........ that's about right.

Just hope to God you don't do well the first time out, you'll never match it :(

kroberts
July 31, 2005, 20:09
I didn't know there were really doves in the North Zone!!!

When it rains the weekend before opening day, dont get too mad.

Lemme see, 12 dove by $50 each...Sounds like a bargain to me!

Have fun, bring plenty of Gatorade and sunscreen.

kroberts

Plain George
July 31, 2005, 21:06
Here in my area of Colorado we seem to have more doves than any other bird except sparrows and that might be an even match.
I watch them fly around, and YES they are faster than anything.
I imagine I am shooting them and I know each time I "shoot"
I missed the lead by about 30 feet.....lol

'TUDE
July 31, 2005, 22:10
Gman, may I offer an idea since you are not that far away from me?
Just an hour and a half north of you is the Caddo National Grasslands in Fannin County. Living on the edge of it, I can tell you that hunting dove here is no problem and with little worry of other hunters (deer season is another story). This way, you won't have to worry about a lease. Plenty of birds up here for sure.

Advice for a first-timer? Use your already learned safety habits when hunting in a group. Spread out but always be aware of where the others are in relation to your shots fired. A big duh, but I always hear the stories bout "I thought he was over there" after someone took #7 shot to the back.

The best technique I have found around here is to concentrate on water more than food. If you find a good, remote watering hole, you'll find the birds for sure. I'll sweep in with the sun to my back and slowly move birds to the watering hole, giving them plenty of time to move at thier own pace. After your sweep, sneak up on the little critters and have a blast knocking as many as you can out of the sky.

Afterward, clean them, wash them, place a jalepeno into the chest cavity, wrap a peice of peppered bacon around the whole bird with a toothpick holding it in place and grill the thing to perfection. Serve with wild rice, guacamole, baked squash and a bottle of sweet red wine.......oh yeah....mmmmmm.

Give me a shout for more info if need be. There are places in the Caddo that aren't shown on maps and only known to locals.

Dean P
July 31, 2005, 22:54
Grey rocket , I like that. Learn to lead, expect to waste the first box of ammo. Get a good Remington 20 gage model 1100 with a modified choke & know where your other shooters are. A good summer hunting vest & waist pouch are necessary along with water. The best & strangest hunting spot I ever found for dove, was an old abandoned oil well that had been plugged with cement & leaking saltwater. The birds would divebomb you trying to get to it. There was over an acre of land ruined by the saltwater. The old American sportsman's club had it leased for years, the shotgun hulls were ankle deep. It was near Thurber, Texas.

gman552
August 01, 2005, 00:25
Thanks to everyone for their responses. I'll try to get more details from my acquaintance.

I used to shoot skeet at the base skeet & trap club when I was in the USAF, but that was at least ten years ago. I still have the shotgun I shot skeet with (a Smith & Wesson 1000M semi-auto with a 26" barrel). Even when I shot a lot, the best I could do was 18/25.

tn hp, thanks for the checklist.

Faltitude, I may drop you a line in the future.

Survey Punk
August 01, 2005, 07:54
Make double damn sure your shotgun is plugged to 3 rounds. Two in the mag and 1 in the chamber. Doves are a federal game bird and the mullet marshall WILL check your gun.
When you think you've got your lead just right push the gun ahead another 30', close your eyes and yank the trigger.
Also doves are one of the few birds that mate for life. When a pair zoom by you and you drop one be aware the other one may loop around and try to land where the downed bird hit. Sometimes this presents an easy shot. If you fire at #2 as it gets close to the ground be aware of what's behind your target so you don't wrap up a fellow hunter with your shot.

JB

ggiilliiee
August 01, 2005, 11:26
one warning .....if your using a nice shotgun .....DO NOT GET DOVE BLOOD ON IT ...he he .....stuff is worse than blood from an "AILEN'...eats the finish/bluing:skull:

ggiilliiee
August 01, 2005, 11:31
sorry misspelled alien...also a few decoys in the trees aroud ya will help bring them in

photomike
August 01, 2005, 12:33
Originally posted by Faltitude
Gman, may I offer an idea since you are not that far away from me?
Just an hour and a half north of you is the Caddo National Grasslands in Fannin County. Living on the edge of it, I can tell you that hunting dove here is no problem and with little worry of other hunters (deer season is another story). This way, you won't have to worry about a lease. Plenty of birds up here for sure.

Advice for a first-timer? Use your already learned safety habits when hunting in a group. Spread out but always be aware of where the others are in relation to your shots fired. A big duh, but I always hear the stories bout "I thought he was over there" after someone took #7 shot to the back.

The best technique I have found around here is to concentrate on water more than food. If you find a good, remote watering hole, you'll find the birds for sure. I'll sweep in with the sun to my back and slowly move birds to the watering hole, giving them plenty of time to move at thier own pace. After your sweep, sneak up on the little critters and have a blast knocking as many as you can out of the sky.

Afterward, clean them, wash them, place a jalepeno into the chest cavity, wrap a peice of peppered bacon around the whole bird with a toothpick holding it in place and grill the thing to perfection. Serve with wild rice, guacamole, baked squash and a bottle of sweet red wine.......oh yeah....mmmmmm.

Give me a shout for more info if need be. There are places in the Caddo that aren't shown on maps and only known to locals.


not on the map huh? interesting.........want to share??

everytime we've been to Grasslands, the doves were sparse. We've almost gotten to the point of not going there.


Mike

'TUDE
August 01, 2005, 20:44
Mike, I'd be glad to. Any specific areas of the Caddo your interested in? Shoot me a PM or email and I'll forward several spots not mapped and published in any guides or TPWD lit. I know of three gates within 5 minutes of me that are totally overgrown with brush and haven't been visited in years (except maybe from the other side). Many, many areas or "pockets" from 5-200 acres just waiting to be hunted. As far as bird numbers, I've been hunting the Caddo for many years and the only times I was disappointed was when the weather was adverse. The birds may not be as fat as they were last year at this same time but the numbers are there.

kroberts
August 02, 2005, 16:02
What's a caddo and how far is it from San Antonio?

;)

kroberts

photomike
August 02, 2005, 17:04
http://www.fs.fed.us/r8/texas/recreation/caddo_lbj/caddo-lbj_gen_info.shtml

North of D/FW and Denton.

Mike

Para Driver
August 02, 2005, 22:43
wear shooting/sun glasses as you will get lead shot falling on you

form a circle of all the hunters and only shoot outwards

Plenty of Gatorade, bug spray and Cigars..

Opie
August 03, 2005, 00:17
Bring a 5-gallon bucket of shotgun shells....you'll need them :biggrin:
Also practice on "combat reloads" if they come in down there like they do up here in Oregon, ya can't stuff shells into the shotgun quick enough..:uhoh:

Good luck and enjoy yourself.

photomike
August 03, 2005, 11:04
try dove hunting in Argentina......I just got back a month ago:biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin:

I highly recommend it!!

M.Rehme
August 04, 2005, 03:30
photomike,
I am looking for a place to go in Argentina, the guys I know have a good place to hunt but it is booked up, can you give me any help?
Thanks,
Mark

photomike
August 04, 2005, 10:38
try here:

www.siersafaris.com

We hunted and stayed at the La Paloma Riverside lodge which is their new lodge. They also have a place in Bahia Blance if you guys want to do geese/ducks on the same trip. They only problem with that is it's 600 miles south in Patagonia and it'll take a day of traveling to get there out of your trip.

I went with my buddy, his Dad and friends. They have hunted with this outfitter previously.

I had a blast.

My total was 1067 birds in 8 hunts. The goose outfitter that we hunt with in South Texas went with us and he shot over 2500 birds.

As a group, we took 13,981 doves.

You cannot believe how many birds are there, but they are definitely there.

Hope this helps you out.

Mike

photomike
August 10, 2005, 11:22
Faltitude,

PM'd you.

Mike

justashooter
August 10, 2005, 13:53
Originally posted by Plain George
I guessing as an end result, those doves (the ones you kill) will cost you about $50.00 each....

they fall cheaper in south lousiana soy fields.