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View Full Version : Anyone know anything about the politics of Sweden?


BroncoMafia
May 14, 2004, 15:34
I have a great job offer over there and wondering if it is a cess-pool of socialist crap, with wave after wave of unwanted illigal imigrants, of if it is different/better in that regard than here.

I have already asked if I get to wear one of those bitchin' helmuts with the horns coming out the side.

Their answer?

YES!

Seriously though . . . . what's the 411 on Sweden?
And don't say hot chicks unless you post pics.

Mahatma
May 14, 2004, 16:03
Sweden is very socialist. It is a craddle-to-grave political system. At one time, it had the highest suicide rate in Europe, IIRC. Also, social mores are very loose.

BroncoMafia
May 14, 2004, 16:13
Figures:-(
How about Amsterdam?
I have an option for the same job there too . . .

legion489
May 14, 2004, 20:10
Sweden is a socialist cesspool. Other than that, it is a nice place, nice people, clean, lots of illegals flooding in, as is most of Europe. Holland was nice too, but DO NOT tell they you are an American. I went to a friend's wedding and everyone was "Oh I love Canadians!" "Um....I'm an American." Man, talk about letting a fart in church! I knew just enough to know they didn't like Americans, but not enough to really figure out what they were saying. My friend would NOT translate either!

Da Nerd
May 14, 2004, 20:59
Originally posted by BroncoMafia
Figures:-(
How about Amsterdam?
I have an option for the same job there too . . .

<B>Amsterdam is even worse...DRUGS PROSTITUTION, you name it.
Have you ever wondered WHY these jobs are avail at such salaries.??
Because the places suck</B>

tulsamal
May 14, 2004, 21:57
Holland was nice too, but DO NOT tell they you are an American.

I don't know what that was about. Holland was one of the most pro-American countries when I lived in Europe. And they weren't shy about saying it was because of the way we took care of them after WWII. Nice people. Maybe you were just with some atypical group. (Now I don't know how it would be right now with the whole Bush/UN/Iraq thing going on.)

Gregg

FAL4EVER
May 15, 2004, 19:21
Amsterdam is even worse...DRUGS PROSTITUTION, you name it.

And somehow, that's EXACTLY why it seems the whole world wants to visit Amsterdam.

My wife is American. She's been here for almost 6 years now, and has no problem telling people she's American. She still doesn't speak Dutch, because everybody speaks English to her.
Other than that, we do have troops in Iraq.

Da Nerd
May 15, 2004, 21:15
6 years and still cant speak Dutch? SHAME ON HER.
I was 2 years in Geneva and it only took 6 months to become fluent in French.
BTW my mother came from Groinigen (sp) Holland
The Netherlands of today are not the Netherlands that my mother's family lived in. that is for sure.

martin35
May 16, 2004, 19:00
First things first what will be your tax burden while living in each country? Once the revenuers find your place of employment its tax time. A remittance of enough money to live on and bank the rest at home If you run short you can do a transfer between banks.
Amsterdam is my choice, the people in both places used to be very friendly to Americans, more so in Holland. Both countries are Socialist.

BroncoMafia
May 16, 2004, 19:25
Not too thrilled about the drugs and protitution since I would be bringing my wife and children with me.

I just don't think I can live happily in a socialist state.

Thanks for all the feedback guys.

I think I'll start a different thread on what the best state in the US is for personal freedom and sportsment in particular.

Rhineland1
May 17, 2004, 09:16
Just got back from Holland. The ones I ran into were very nice and could not care less if you were american or anything else for that matter. Currently they are some of the nicest people as a nation in europe.

I did run into a great many of the Dutch while visiting the D-Day beaches and cemetaries. They were very respectful of the past.

And finially, talk about women, they were all about 5,8 or taller, blond and built very well.

0007
May 18, 2004, 23:53
2nd Rhinelands post about the Neatherlands. Nicest Europeans I met, and they all spoke English as a second language.

Bentley8
May 19, 2004, 01:03
Of the Swedes I've known, mostly engineers at Volvo, they've been great *people*, but I do think the socialism they have in Sweden is extreme. A co-worker of my girlfriends was Swedish and just returned after working here for two years. Although she did miss her home, she definitely wanted to keep living here in the US.

The company I used to work for was a US-subsidiary of a large Dutch corporation. Of the Dutch co-workers I met, they were all very, very nice. When any of us from the US went over there we were treated very well, although they were in Tilburg and Rotterdam, not Amsterdam.

The Dutch have a socialist-style government, though they have pockets of resistance. Tilburg has started experimenting with out-sourcing most city government functions in order to reduce the cost and size of government. That's a good start. As I understand it, it's been successful, too. I think the Dutch tax over 50% of your income, but I may be wrong.

The drugs and prostitution in Amsterdam are above board and well-regulated, which keeps things orderly. If you avoid very specific parts of town you won't even see it. They do have a very relaxed social attitude about most vices. I read of how small pouches, like small teabags, have moist snuff in them. These are marketed towards young girls (tweens and teenagers). They like it since it gives them the nicotine without the smoke and they don't have to keep a can of Copenhagen in their back pocket. Can you see people in the US having a coronary over RJR doing something like that?

On the lighter side:
From what I've heard you need to be careful of public toilets in the Netherlands. It's a pay toilet, seats one person, and is on a timer. As your time winds down a tone will start beeping. That's your warning. When your time is up, the stall door opens automatically. My friends that got caught by this were caught in the sitting position, pants at the ankles, with the door wide open onto a public square. :uhoh:
The instructions, including the warning about the time limit and beeping tone, were in Dutch, not English. A most insiduous tourist trap. :wink:
I don't know if they have these things in Amsterdam or not, but as described to me, they are white in color, and shaped like a rounded cone. Avoid!

If I was going to live in Europe I'd probably prefer some place like Holland or Finland.

kaiserworks
May 19, 2004, 04:11
Sweden: great people, beautiful country, plenty of game if you jump through the hoops to get a hunting license. Not my first or tenth choice as a place to live though. The beautiful spring and summer make you forget the brutal reality of a dark winter which IS the longest season. I liked the west coast (Goteborg) the best. Sure they are a big socialist state which might work when you have such a small indigenous population but alas the liberals upset the balance with unchecked immigration over the previous decades. At least they resisted jumping on the EU bandwagon and rejected the adoption of the Euro, thereby retaining some independence.

Nederland: the Dutch are the proverbial "Texans" of Europe. Very independent, tough, free-thinking, friendly people. I lived there for a year and visited on many occasions and I can't say I met anyone anti-American there. Sure, they think we're strange, but woudn't you if your cable tv channels showed UNCENSORED episodes of COPS and Jerry Springer 24/7? Sure ya would! Guns are tightly controlled but many own them illegally (just like Kalifornia and Massachusetts!!!), especially the older generation (who remember the Nazi's) but won't say publicly. I rented an apartment from a retired merchant marine, and randomly got into a conversation about guns with him about a month before I came back to the states. He says "let me show you something" and takes me up to the storage area of his attic, and starts through a pile of boxes. Finally after about 10 minutes of rumaging, he pulls out a pristine MP40 with 3 mags in the original shipping crate. Looking behind him, I see there are 2 other identical crates! Seems he was about 12 when the Nazi's retreated and according to him, "stuff was laying everywhere". Anyway, I'm off subject here...
Did I mention that politicians take public transport? Seems like the cops go home around 10pm for lack of things to do, except in the center of urban areas. You won't need a car, and people are fairly conservative politically (thats why prostitution is legal and soft drugs are decriminalized... the Guv'ment stays out of your private life) but liberal socially. The most serious crime I heard of was grafitti and petty theft. The weather is similar to Seattle area alot of the year; cold rain, but summers are surprisingly hot and humid. Sure, they tax the hell out of you, but at least they tell you up front, unlike here in the states where you get quadrouple taxed on everything behind the scenes. So as you can tell, my vote would be with A'dam.
Tot ziens,
-Greg

stimpsonjcat
May 19, 2004, 08:59
Systembolaget!

Green bags of SHAME!

thunderchicken
May 19, 2004, 10:29
Didn't sytembolaget get nixed by the EU as a restraint of trade? As my Swedish relatives explained when I asked, systembolaget (The state liquor monopoly) was just because the Swedes realized that without tight controls on alcohol, they might end up like the Finns.

Swedish "socialism" results in an economy where everyone is reasonably well to do, most have a country/vacation house as well as their primary dwelling in my observation. Tax rates are high, but you get more for it. Seems like a wash. People don't seem to have an excess of consumer gee gaws, but what they do have is high quality. They are more friendly toward foreigners than they are to eachother. They are beginning to have to deal with immigration from low wage countries, but the situation is not as extreme as it is here. They are melancholy like most people who live in places where it is dark half the year. I like them, but I wouldn't want to live there.